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Topics surrounding general assessment and the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Systems.

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cottonsteven
cottonsteven
Posts: 2


4/28/2014
cottonsteven
cottonsteven
Posts: 2
Please help! After years of "No guided reading books sent home!" recently our district started having our primary kids take guided reading instructional books home after the teacher determined they were able to read them independently. It was my understanding that the purpose of reading instructional materials to someone at home helped with fluency, built the student's confidence, allowed parents to be aware of how and what their child is reading/learning at school, etc. I learned today that this practice is being reversed and once again the policy will be "No guided reading books sent home!" I'm crushed to say the least. A decision made that will hurt student achievement in my opinion, and that is all I have, an opinion. Is there research, a best practice summary, ANYTHING that I can reference to professionally support my opinion? Thanks for your help.
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Kathy Northcutt, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Kathy Northcutt, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Administrator
Posts: 150


4/29/2014
Hello and thank you for your question. Books that students take home should include texts that are easily read, so, as you've said, many times students will take home books that are really at their independent reading levels. Books that are read and reread are excellent for the reasons you've outlined. Marie Clay's work with Reading Recovery research provides a rationale for rereading books at home that were read in class. Then, you will also find lots of research about the value of reading at home. However, the research will support having children and parents enjoy reading together, whether books are read together in a shared way or read by either parents or children.
I don't know if you have access to a Reading Recovery Guide Book or Literacy Lessons, but either of those publications will review her research on rereading. Kathy Northcutt, consultant
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cottonsteven
cottonsteven
Posts: 2


4/29/2014
cottonsteven
cottonsteven
Posts: 2
Kathy, Thank you for this helpful information.

Other Readers, I would be interested in your experiences with kids taking guided reading books home after they have received instruction and are independent with the text. Thanks for your help!
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User Carrie
User Carrie
Posts: 72


5/2/2014
User Carrie
User Carrie
Posts: 72
In the PD our school received from F&P trainers, the guided reading books do not leave the table. You are saying you've determined that they are independent before they are sent home. Was a benchmark assessment given or a running record to determine this? An experience with the text or two at the guided table does not make the guided book "automatically" independent. I would need more information about how to answer your question but, I know the instructional or "guided" book is not recommended to go home. :) One activity that I've seen highlighted on the Literacy Collaborative webpage is Rasinski's "poem a day" or fluency development activity. It's got a homework piece that really appeals to parents and is proven in the Clearinghouse research to increase achievement in fluency and comprehension. The kind of parent homework with this type of reinforcement with repeated readings is more appropriate than what should occur with a guided reading book. Our teachers were told to consider ourselves the "expert" in reading instruction and to leave it to us. So support is great for home but fluency and comprehension instruction with a text left to parents with no literacy training could pose an issue. I hope this makes sense. Our first grade team struggled with the idea at first and then came around to embracing the thinking of keeping the guided reading books at school.
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