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Cafe Style Conferencing vs. Guided Reading Messages in this topic - RSS

gwendolyn_ressler
gwendolyn_ressler
Posts: 1


11/30/2017
Working with a teacher who last year only ran Cafe (Daily 5) conferences with students on their self selected books. Our district is now requiring all K-6 teachers implement Guided Reading after receiving Fountas and Pinnell training. I see benefits of both approaches but also see them as quite different. Wondering what the F&P Literacy Team or others would say about the benefits of Guided Reading over/vs. Cafe style conferencing.
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Xtina
Xtina
Posts: 19


11/30/2017
Xtina
Xtina
Posts: 19
Our school is also moving toward guided reading. I see both conferring and guided reading happening during the readers' workshop. One of the days the teacher could put in time to confer during independent reading with individual readers. This is especially helpful for those students that are reading above benchmark and need less daily instruction. The greatest benefit of a GR group is you can instruct multiple students at about the same level working on the same reading behaviors, more "bang for your buck". Also, GR group instruction is at the students' instructional level. Most of the conferring teachers do is with independent books that are self-selected. GR is where the explicit teaching takes place. Conferring is a good way to confirm your teaching and reinforce what you have already taught.
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 407


11/30/2017
gwendolyn_ressler wrote:
Working with a teacher who last year only ran Cafe (Daily 5) conferences with students on their self selected books. Our district is now requiring all K-6 teachers implement Guided Reading after receiving Fountas and Pinnell training. I see benefits of both approaches but also see them as quite different. Wondering what the F&P Literacy Team or others would say about the benefits of Guided Reading over/vs. Cafe style conferencing.


You are right they are different and each has an important role in literacy instruction. The design of Responsive Literacy Teaching illustrates that Independent Reading (IR) and conferring are (and have always been) included in the FP model. http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/resource?id=370
Look under the Explore/Classroom Resources tab for more information about the IR part of the Fountas and Pinnell Classroom model. www.fountasandpinnell.com/fpc/
Best wishes for success!
Debbie
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 407


11/30/2017
Xtina wrote:
Our school is also moving toward guided reading. I see both conferring and guided reading happening during the readers' workshop. One of the days the teacher could put in time to confer during independent reading with individual readers. This is especially helpful for those students that are reading above benchmark and need less daily instruction. The greatest benefit of a GR group is you can instruct multiple students at about the same level working on the same reading behaviors, more "bang for your buck". Also, GR group instruction is at the students' instructional level. Most of the conferring teachers do is with independent books that are self-selected. GR is where the explicit teaching takes place. Conferring is a good way to confirm your teaching and reinforce what you have already taught.

Thank you for providing your helpful tips!
Debbie
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KATEBELINDA
KATEBELINDA
Posts: 1


24 days ago
KATEBELINDA
KATEBELINDA
Posts: 1
Our school has decided to move into Strategy Groups instead of GR but I am so hesitant as I know the success I've had with GR even our Prep students are doing strategy and no GR at all. Any thoughts
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 558


24 days ago
KATEBELINDA wrote:
Our school has decided to move into Strategy Groups instead of GR but I am so hesitant as I know the success I've had with GR even our Prep students are doing strategy and no GR at all. Any thoughts


Although I do not have the answer for you, I am wondering if you could do both?

Reading Mini-Lessons (which are typically whole-group) are included in the new Fountas and Pinnell Classroom (which might be comparable to the purpose of strategy groups). F&P state, “A whole-group instructional context, Reading Minilessons are concise, purposeful lessons with a practical application in a specific area of literacy. Each minilesson engages children in inquiry that leads to the discovery and understanding of a general principle. Often, interactive read-aloud books that children have already heard serve as mentor texts from which they generalize the understanding.” The teacher provides an explicit minilesson for children to apply to their independent reading and writing about reading/drawing.

In Guided Reading Responsive Teaching Across the Grades, Fountas and Pinnell state, “The ultimate goal of instruction is to enable readers to work their way through a text independently, so all teaching is directed toward helping the individuals within the group build systems of strategic actions that they initiate and control for themselves. Guided reading leads to the independent reading that builds the process; it is the heart of an effective literacy program....we emphasize that guided reading is only one component of a comprehensive literacy design. Although it is important, guided reading is not intended to be the only literacy instruction a student receives during the day..... We emphasize that guided reading should be embedded within a coherent literacy program” Chapter 15, “Teaching for Systems of Strategic Actions in Guided Reading,” connects the theoretical base to the kinds of teaching moves that support strategic actions.”

Fountas and Pinnell always state that the instructional decisions should be based on the student population served and your district. Although your district will be the deciding factor on what you teach and how you teach there is a great deal of research that suggests that multiple approaches using multiple texts must be included in an effective literacy program. One size never fits all and children need a variety of texts and multiple opportunities to engage in, understand and practice the reading process.

I hope this information helps. We wish you success in the year ahead.

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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