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Hybrid Text Messages in this topic - RSS

Lisa F.
Lisa F.
Posts: 9


2/8/2018
Lisa F.
Lisa F.
Posts: 9
Could you please give me an example or two of a hybrid text? Would a narrative nonfiction text, such as "Emily's Amazing Journey" (M - FPC GR), be an example since it combines a story structure although it is based on real events?

Thank you for your clarification.
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 537


2/8/2018
Lisa F. wrote:
Could you please give me an example or two of a hybrid text? Would a narrative nonfiction text, such as "Emily's Amazing Journey" (M - FPC GR), be an example since it combines a story structure although it is based on real events?

Thank you for your clarification.


Emily’s Amazing Journey is a nonfiction narrative, a real event told in the form of a story, using some nonfiction text features: illustrations and photographs to illustrate the story. It features a table of contents, headings, sidebars, and maps. Although not classified as a hybrid text in the lesson guide, it is a great introduction to combining text features.

An example of a hybrid nonfiction text that includes both narrative and expository structures and features is Elephants Can Paint Too, by Katya Arnold, which tells a (true) story about elephants painting, while additional facts about the elephants and techniques are provided in boxed sections. The additional facts provided give new information about elephants that may be unknown to the reader. One Tiny Turtle (by Nicola Davies) is a narrative text that is also accompanied by separate text listing facts about turtles.

Hybrid books that blend a narrative fiction story with accompanying expository facts provides the comfort of a story while introducing students to fascinating information.  Nicola Davie's new book I (Don't) Like Snakes is another great example of hybrid text. 

For students reading these texts, the challenge is to navigate among the different genres, understanding them individually as well as exploring the ways that they are connected and interrelated.

Thanks for a great question.

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Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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