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Topics surrounding general assessment and the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Systems.

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A88
A88
Posts: 1


6/13/2018
A88
A88
Posts: 1
In the lower level books many high frequency words are repeated throughout the text. How soon should I provide a student with a word when they are balking or appealing to the teacher to tell them a given word that is on every page of the level A, B, C, D text? \

I feel as if the student balks or appeals to the teacher on the first page because they cannot read the word "like" and the word is told to them an counted as an error the assessment will be invalid because they will then correctly read the word "like" on the other 8 pages and there are only 28 words in a story.

I struggle to remember the "rule" for this situation.
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 626


6/14/2018
A88 wrote:
In the lower level books many high frequency words are repeated throughout the text. How soon should I provide a student with a word when they are balking or appealing to the teacher to tell them a given word that is on every page of the level A, B, C, D text? \

I feel as if the student balks or appeals to the teacher on the first page because they cannot read the word "like" and the word is told to them an counted as an error the assessment will be invalid because they will then correctly read the word "like" on the other 8 pages and there are only 28 words in a story.

I struggle to remember the "rule" for this situation.


Part of a formative assessment is determining what the child can do on their own and what they need help with. If the child stops at a word, you can silently count about three seconds then say, “You try it” and give a small wait to see if there is a response. The wait time is important because it allows us to see if the child can independently search and then provide a response on their own. Whether the response is correct or not, it provides us with additional information. If they do not respond, give the word.

When a text has very few words on a page and you are telling the same word on every page, the text will probably end up being ‘hard’. This tells you that the child is not reading for meaning, using structure to inform their reading or using visual cues to attempt to process the text. The child is also not assimilating the information provided. (Another good piece of information for future instruction.)

If the reader is told the word and then applies that information to future pages, you have an indication of how readily the child assimilates new information. You are seeing that this reader is able to apply new information to the processor this level. We want to find the level at which the child will be able to process text with just a bit of support. This is typically the instructional level.

Your goal is to find the independent, instructional and hard levels of text and then use the processing information for placement.

I hope this helps,

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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