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Topics surrounding general assessment and the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Systems.

Instructional level question Messages in this topic - RSS

Sue R.
Sue R.
Posts: 5


11 days ago
Sue R.
Sue R.
Posts: 5
When administering a formal running record using the BAS is there ever a time you would not go to the highest instructional level?
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 590


10 days ago
Sue R. wrote:
When administering a formal running record using the BAS is there ever a time you would not go to the highest instructional level?


Fountas and Pinnell state, in the Benchmark Assessment Guide, page 16: By the end of the assessment you should have three levels: (1) the highest level read independently, (2) the highest level read instructionally, and (3) the level that is too difficult for the child (hard text). Then you can make a decision about the recommended placement level—the best level for instructional reading.

Some districts place a ‘CAP’ on levels, stopping the assessment one year beyond the reader’s grade level. This would be due to maturity and age appropriate text. This may not be a ‘one size fits all’ but most kids need more, not higher. The Literacy Continuum needs to be the ‘go to’ source when pursuing depth of understanding, creating connections and making comparisons as well as understanding all genre at that level. While a particular text at a high level may be appropriate due to the reader’s ability to decode and somewhat understand, it doesn’t mean the text is a good choice for them. I would suggest you refer to the F&P Literacy Continuum. It will give guidance regarding the goals for proficient reading at each text level as well as the text features and characteristics that should be covered.

Going higher is not always the answer. Going broader is the challenge. That challenge is met through understanding and using the Literacy Continuum. 

We wish you success,

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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Ollie
Ollie
Posts: 2


3 days ago
Ollie
Ollie
Posts: 2
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Sue R. wrote:
When administering a formal running record using the BAS is there ever a time you would not go to the highest instructional level?


Fountas and Pinnell state, in the Benchmark Assessment Guide, page 16: By the end of the assessment you should have three levels: (1) the highest level read independently, (2) the highest level read instructionally, and (3) the level that is too difficult for the child (hard text). Then you can make a decision about the recommended placement level—the best level for instructional reading.

Some districts place a ‘CAP’ on levels, stopping the assessment one year beyond the reader’s grade level. This would be due to maturity and age appropriate text. This may not be a ‘one size fits all’ but most kids need more, not higher. The Literacy Continuum needs to be the ‘go to’ source when pursuing depth of understanding, creating connections and making comparisons as well as understanding all genre at that level. While a particular text at a high level may be appropriate due to the reader’s ability to decode and somewhat understand, it doesn’t mean the text is a good choice for them. I would suggest you refer to the F&P Literacy Continuum. It will give guidance regarding the goals for proficient reading at each text level as well as the text features and characteristics that should be covered.

Going higher is not always the answer. Going broader is the challenge. That challenge is met through understanding and using the Literacy Continuum.

We wish you success,
0 link
Ollie
Ollie
Posts: 2


3 days ago
Ollie
Ollie
Posts: 2
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Sue R. wrote:
When administering a formal running record using the BAS is there ever a time you would not go to the highest instructional level?


Fountas and Pinnell state, in the Benchmark Assessment Guide, page 16: By the end of the assessment you should have three levels: (1) the highest level read independently, (2) the highest level read instructionally, and (3) the level that is too difficult for the child (hard text). Then you can make a decision about the recommended placement level—the best level for instructional reading.

Some districts place a ‘CAP’ on levels, stopping the assessment one year beyond the reader’s grade level. This would be due to maturity and age appropriate text. This may not be a ‘one size fits all’ but most kids need more, not higher. The Literacy Continuum needs to be the ‘go to’ source when pursuing depth of understanding, creating connections and making comparisons as well as understanding all genre at that level. While a particular text at a high level may be appropriate due to the reader’s ability to decode and somewhat understand, it doesn’t mean the text is a good choice for them. I would suggest you refer to the F&P Literacy Continuum. It will give guidance regarding the goals for proficient reading at each text level as well as the text features and characteristics that should be covered.

Going higher is not always the answer. Going broader is the challenge. That challenge is met through understanding and using the Literacy Continuum.

We wish you success,
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