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Discuss Leveled Literacy Intervention and the LLI supporting resources.

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The Fountas & Pinnell Team
The Fountas & Pinnell Team
Posts: 292


8/31/2010
Hi, EP!

At Heinemann.com under the Fountas and Pinnell tab, in the right hand column, you will see Research and Data Collection. You will find the research and data for both the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Systems and the Fountas & Pinnell Leveled Literacy Intervention. There is valuable information that will help you with your grant writing. Best wishes and hope that you receive your grant!

~The Fountas & Pinnell Team

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The Fountas & Pinnell Team

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User 594110
User 594110
Posts: 1


1/26/2015
User 594110
User 594110
Posts: 1
I am a resource room teacher (elementary) for mildly impaired students with Learning Disabilities and Speech and Language Impairments. I am looking for empirical evidence to support the use of Guided Reading with mildly impaired special education students. Can you provide references for studies that have been done with this population. Thank you
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 310


3/3/2015
You might consider reading the Efficacy Study conducted on the Fountas and Pinnell Leveled Literacy Intervention at this link: http://www.heinemann.com/fountasandpinnell/research/LLI_DataColl_SPED-subreport_JULY2011.pdf Although LLI is more intense and requires more explicit instruction, the same behavioral strategies are taught in guided reading.

Also, here is a bit more information from an earlier post: Although Fountas & Pinnell programs such as BAS and LLI are not specifically designed for students with autism/dyslexia or other learning disabilities, many people do use them in such circumstances. (see this forum thread for an example). Some research has been done on using guided reading with autistic children (this article, for example), but for the most part the programs are used in regular education classrooms. While many people use Fountas & Pinnell guided reading programs for special needs students, there hasn't yet been a large-scale study on this topic, and the programs themselves are not specifically designed for special needs populations.

All evidence available at this time indicates that the instructional principles of guided reading are appropriate for use with special needs students, and this is something that Fountas & Pinnell hope to address more closely in their upcoming work.

Here are a few more articles that you might find helpful:
Supporting Literacy With Guided Reading
Strategies for Teaching Reading to Visual Learners
The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) also has several articles on using guided reading with special needs students, but many of them are available to members only.

We hope this helps.

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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User Carrie
User Carrie
Posts: 72


4/2/2015
User Carrie
User Carrie
Posts: 72
Irene and Gay wrote:
Dear Stephanie:

Thank you for your inquiry. We do not recommend the LLI format for classroom groups. Guided reading is a powerful structure for children`s literacy learning in groups in the regular classroom program. In the guided reading lesson, the teacher does use the same facilitative language we discussed related to strategic activities. The language is not specific to Reading Recovery™ or LLI. The Prompting Guide we used is a tool for all literacy teachers. The theoretical knowledge that underlies Reading Recovery, LLI, and guided reading is similar. However, the LLI structure is more intense for the lowest achieving children. We hope this helps.

Our best,
Irene and Gay


May I add, humbly, that LLI uses instructional then independent (review level) every other lesson. Guided reading is the instructional level for students with similar instructional needs for each lesson. This instructional level is their proximal zone of development every time you meet vs. interchanging C then A for example for odd and even day LLI lesson structures. :)
edited by User Carrie on 4/2/2015
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User 661365
User 661365
Posts: 1


12/10/2015
User 661365
User 661365
Posts: 1
Customer Feedback wrote:
Is LLI an appropriate program for use with students labeled as having the characteristics of dyslexia?

Contributed by: Annette Price


I am a parent whose child did the LLI program in 2nd grade for a year 4 times a week for 30mins a day. My child is Dx with Dyslexia and did not make any long term progress with LLI, in fact he regressed during the program and lost a precious early intervention year. Suffering failure with this program caused my child unnecessary anxiety and depression as he desperately was motivated to read successfully like his peers. Fortunately we took educational matters into our own hands and paid privately for an Orton-Gillingham program that is structured Mulit-sensory program. Dyslexic children do not achieve long term literacy progress with Fountas and Pinnell LLI. It may look as though those children are making progress in the short term to the teacher they have that year, but but because it isn't multi-sensory doesn't go into the long term memory. There are also too many gaps, structured literacy on the other hand is totally systematic, and provides the sequential de-coding skills moving on only after the student has shown mastery. F & P moves on daily whether the child has shown mastery or not.
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 310


12/12/2015
Dear Annette,


Thank you for contacting us. We are glad to hear that you have found a program that you feel is benefitting your son and his literacy learning. Each child is different and may need different approaches. We do have many children (labeled dyslexic) who have benefitted in the long term when teachers have used the LLI program five days a week, 30 minutes per day in the primary grades. These teachers have, at times, found the need to stop forward movement in lessons to "shore up" the student's strategies needed for real reading and writing. We do, in fact, encourage teachers (see pages 97-104 in the Program Guide) to monitor progress carefully, making adjustments based on the learning needs of each student as they move forward in teaching processing behaviors.


Here are a few of the suggestions copied from those pages: 1) 'Look at the Continuum for the level to be sure the children control most of the behaviors' before moving forward 2) If you notice a child not moving as quickly a) Give the child some extra help… doing some extra reading, word work, or writing with the child. (b) Slow down a bit by having a few “reading” or “writing” days to consolidate learning. 3) When you have children in a group, you can not expect them all to perform in exactly the same way. Assess the child carefully using a reading record to be sure the text level is within reach with instructional support. 3) In our experience, with the intensive support you provide in LLI lessons, children can move up the levels at the designated pace. If you think children need a few more days on a level, you can (where possible) “borrow” texts and lessons from across the three collections (Orange, Green, and Blue). 4) We encourage you to adjust the lesson in any way justified by information from your ongoing assessment and observation of learners’ strengths and needs. No lesson plan can be written to fit all children. Your decision-making across the lesson is critical. You will find yourself tailoring lessons to meet children’s needs. 5) When you notice gaps in the phonics/word analysis area: …look at The Continuum of Literacy Learning and at the phonics and word study activities for that level and the previous level. It may be that you will need to spend a day or two just tidying up some phonics knowledge that will be essential as the children move into higher texts. Work closely with the classroom teacher to identify areas of support needed.


Our number one goal is to help children become proficient readers and writers. As you stated, proficiency requires mastery. As you can see, from the examples listed above, to achieve proficiency in reading and writing, daily progress monitoring and instructional decision-making based on the learning needs of each student is required.


Thank you for taking the time to share your comments and concerns with us. This information will continue to help us as we provide ongoing professional development to teachers who are using the LLI Systems. We wish you and your son the very best.

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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User 685583
User 685583
Posts: 1


5/1/2016
User 685583
User 685583
Posts: 1
Although this thread is old, it contains some dangerous words. Dyslexia is not an umbrella term that encompasses a variety of learning disabilities.

"“Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurobiological in origin. It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities. These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction. Secondary consequences may include problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experience that can impede growth of vocabulary and background knowledge.”
Adopted by the IDA Board of Directors, Nov. 12, 2002. "


Irene and Gay wrote:
Dear Annette and Sharon,

Dyslexia is an umbrella term that covers a variety of learning disabilities. LLI was not specifically designed to meet the needs of students who have been tested and determined to have learning disabilities and been given an I.E.P. In general, it is an early intervention designed to be used when the teacher`s assessment shows that the student has difficulty and is not able to meet grade level standards. It`s broad base allows for acceleration across reading, writing, and phonics, and the combination of research-based instructional actions meets the needs of most students.

LLI can be used with learning disabled students after a team meets and determines that the components of LLI are consistent with the student`s I.E.P. Many students have been served in this category.

Our best,
Irene and Gay
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kafsabizarin
kafsabizarin
Posts: 1


20 days ago
kafsabizarin
kafsabizarin
Posts: 1
Customer Feedback wrote:
LLI and Balanced Literacy – How do they mesh?

Our county is moving into a Balanced Literacy framework, guided by the principles in your publications. We fortunately have teachers and literacy coaches who have been trained as Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative teachers to help us think through our learning and implementation. Will the LLI framework provide the same sort of theory and implementation so that our EIP and Special Ed children not be involved in a different framework - very concerned for our first grade kids! thanks!
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Contributed by: Lynda Clary-Burke

edited by kafsabizarin on 8/3/2017
edited by kafsabizarin on 8/3/2017
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 310


20 days ago
kafsabizarin wrote:
Customer Feedback wrote:
LLI and Balanced Literacy – How do they mesh?

Our county is moving into a Balanced Literacy framework, guided by the principles in your publications. We fortunately have teachers and literacy coaches who have been trained as Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative teachers to help us think through our learning and implementation. Will the LLI framework provide the same sort of theory and implementation so that our EIP and Special Ed children not be involved in a different framework - very concerned for our first grade kids! thanks!

Contributed by: Lynda Clary-Burke

edited by kafsabizarin on 8/3/2017
edited by kafsabizarin on 8/3/2017


Although the framework of LLI, Reading Recovery and Guided Reading Lessons are slightly different, the theory behind these programs are very similar. You will find that all three compliment and support one another. Here are a couple links that might be helpful: http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/354
http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/default?type=instructional%20tools

Best wishes as you implement the best instructional tools for your students.

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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