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1 days ago
Topic:
Please change the continuum

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 290
Firstgrade216 wrote:
As a primary teacher with over 20 years teaching experience I am urging you to change your grade level expectations for growth. Schools are using these guidelines to base instruction for kids that may not be debelopmentally ready. My suggestions is to change the continuum to look like this K-2 : FNP levels aa-M.
This makes more sense to me because yes we will have students on the far end of the spectrum in first grade but for some we won't see that for second grade. This in turn will help eliminate the need for interventions at the primary grades. We are pushing some kids too hard and it's turning them off to school and reading. If this continuum changes it's allowing growth at the pace of the children.


Please refer to this explanation by Fountas and Pinnell...
The Instructional Level Expectations for Reading chart is a thinking tool: a way to think about text levels on the F&P Text Level Gradient™. Across the year, teachers look carefully at where a student is and work to provide the necessary level of support. As a teacher, you need to have a vision for your students’ progress, and we know that this vision can be accomplished more successfully if teachers work with each other. An example of approximate expectations for a year of progress by grade level is shown in this chart. Expectations can help you and your colleagues meet readers’ needs and support them so that they make optimum progress. This chart is intended to provide general guidelines for grade level goals which should be adjusted based on school/district requirements and professional teacher judgment.


Proficient readers and writers display recognizable behaviors at every phase of literacy learning. When teachers notice, teach, and support these behaviors, they link assessment to responsive teaching. The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum identifies these behaviors which are described as a continua of learning across eight instructional contexts.


These materials are designed to help teachers determine the best instructional approaches and teaching points during differentiated instruction to make the optimum progress. Research indicates that early intervention is key. As stated earlier, the Level Expectations Reading Chart is a thinking tool and should be adjusted based on school/district requirements and professional teacher judgment.


We wish you the greatest success!
3 days ago
Topic:
Please change the continuum

Firstgrade216
Firstgrade216
Posts: 1
As a primary teacher with over 20 years teaching experience I am urging you to change your grade level expectations for growth. Schools are using these guidelines to base instruction for kids that may not be debelopmentally ready. My suggestions is to change the continuum to look like this K-2 : FNP levels aa-M.
This makes more sense to me because yes we will have students on the far end of the spectrum in first grade but for some we won't see that for second grade. This in turn will help eliminate the need for interventions at the primary grades. We are pushing some kids too hard and it's turning them off to school and reading. If this continuum changes it's allowing growth at the pace of the children.
4 days ago
Topic:
Online Postings of Assessment Forms

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 290
TaraMa wrote:
Do the easily accessed online postings of assessment forms reduce the integrity of the assessment as parents/students can pre-read assessments and comprehension questions?
E.g. http://wsx.sdb.k12.wi.us/sites/TechIT/SMART/Reading%20Resources/Benchmark%20Assessment%20Systems/BAS_System_1_A_to_N%5B2%5D.pdf
http://vwstaffhb.pbworks.com/w/file/fetch/66218497/level_J_genre_F_size_R.pdf
https://www.heinemann.com/shared/productsupport/e02796/bas2es2newgirlrf.pdf
http://cs300x.wikispaces.com/file/view/Level+A-N+Fiction.pdf
and so on . . .


It is against copyright for any school/district or any outside entity to publicly post the recording forms online for the exact purpose you describe and because it is the intellectual property of Fountas and Pinnell.

We thank you for bringing this to our attention – it is often times that our educators using BAS are our best defense in locating these publicly posted forms. Our legal team will reach out to these schools and districts to have them taken down.

As for the recording form located in Product Updates on the Heinemann.com site, we will pull that down immediately, as these can be accessed in the Online Resources.

Thank you again for bringing this to our attention.
edited by Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant on 6/23/2017
5 days ago
Topic:
Online Postings of Assessment Forms

TaraMa
TaraMa
Posts: 1
Do the easily accessed online postings of assessment forms reduce the integrity of the assessment as parents/students can pre-read assessments and comprehension questions?
E.g. http://wsx.sdb.k12.wi.us/sites/TechIT/SMART/Reading%20Resources/Benchmark%20Assessment%20Systems/BAS_System_1_A_to_N%5B2%5D.pdf
http://vwstaffhb.pbworks.com/w/file/fetch/66218497/level_J_genre_F_size_R.pdf
https://www.heinemann.com/shared/productsupport/e02796/bas2es2newgirlrf.pdf
http://cs300x.wikispaces.com/file/view/Level+A-N+Fiction.pdf
and so on . . .
6 days ago
Topic:
New to group

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 290
patsyb wrote:
Forgive me if I am asking questions in the wrong place. I have been a teacher for over 20 years. I am trying to catch up with current best practices. I teach 6th - 8th grade. What Fountas & Pinnell resources are good for middle school guidance? Thanks for your help.


I would strongly suggest that you start with: Guided Reading, Responsive Teaching Across the Grades by Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell (linked here: http://www.heinemann.com/products/e08684.aspx ). This text includes the lastest theory and instructional approaches regarding teaching reading. This text: The Literacy Continuum (linked here: http://www.heinemann.com/products/e06078.aspx ) will help you set instructional goals for each grade as well as for each gradient of text level you are teaching.

We wish you the very best.
6 days ago
Topic:
New to group

patsyb
patsyb
Posts: 1
patsyb
patsyb
Posts: 1
Topic: New to group
Forgive me if I am asking questions in the wrong place. I have been a teacher for over 20 years. I am trying to catch up with current best practices. I teach 6th - 8th grade. What Fountas & Pinnell resources are good for middle school guidance? Thanks for your help.
7 days ago
Topic:
determine & quantify a year's growth, for all kids

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 290
FabianaA wrote:
There is a Grade Level Growth Chart in Owocki' s (2010) "The RtI Daily planning Book, K-6. It shows start level, end level (goal projection), and approximate grade-level growth. For example a student that started at level D and ended at level to E G H I showed 0.5 grade-level growth.


Thank you for your suggestion. I would also suggest that you compare this chart to the 10 Month Progress Monitoring by Instructional Text Reading Level Chart linked here: http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/139
Some levels, due to complexity of text characteristics, require additional time to develop proficiency of the strategic behaviors required at that gradient level. Note, for example at grade 1: levels F, H and J contain increased complexity of text features and therefore require more time spent on developing the strategic behaviors needed to read for accuracy, fluency and understanding.

Best wishes!
7 days ago
Topic:
determine & quantify a year's growth, for all kids

FabianaA
FabianaA
Posts: 3
There is a Grade Level Growth Chart in Owocki' s (2010) "The RtI Daily planning Book, K-6. It shows start level, end level (goal projection), and approximate grade-level growth. For example a student that started at level D and ended at level to E G H I showed 0.5 grade-level growth.
10 days ago
Topic:
Study Guide for 2nd Edition Guided Reading

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 169
Xtina wrote:
Hi, I am leading a book group starting this fall using the new Guided Reading book. Is there a new study guide to go along with this book? If so, how can I get it?
Thanks, Christina Mead

Unfortunately a new study guide is not available yet. There are so many ways the text can be used, it has been hard to create one guide. The FPClassroom will help provide more guidance in using this resource.

There are webinars under the EXTEND tab that would be good guides to follow until one is ready. There are 5 so far that could be used.
Stay tuned!
Debbie
11 days ago
Topic:
Study Guide for 2nd Edition Guided Reading

Xtina
Xtina
Posts: 7
Hi, I am leading a book group starting this fall using the new Guided Reading book. Is there a new study guide to go along with this book? If so, how can I get it?
Thanks, Christina Mead
11 days ago
Topic:
Do we count pronunciation as an error?

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 169
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Jennifer Jinks wrote:
It seems that mispronounced words are being counted in running records as errors. Could anyone at Fountas and Pinnell please clarify if pronunciation should be counted as an error or not?

The standards were established by Marie Clay in developing Running Records. In An Observation Survey, p. 64 (2002 edition) #8 a) Broken words. where a word is pronounced as two words (for example a/way) even when this is backed up by pointing as if it were two words, this is regarded as an error of pronunciation, not as a reading error unless what is said is matched to a different word. b) Childish pronunciations such as 'pitcher' for picture' and 'gonna' for going to' are counted as correct.
These exact words were used in Running Records for Classroom Teachers (2000)

The BAS Guides for Coding and Scoring Reading Records do not mention this because it is so rare. The most common word questioned is 'de' for 'the' or other words with the /th/ cluster. These are really more articulation errors than pronunciation. Articulation or speech impediments do not count as reading errors. The BAS books were developed with care not to use words that children often mispronounce like 'spaghetti' to avoid this pronunciation problem. However, there could be a child who mispronounces a word in everyday language for which this is an issue. If this is showing up, I would use Dr. Clay's definition for scoring.

I hope this clarifies the problem for you. If you have a specific example I would be happy to help.
Best wishes for success!
Debbie


For some reason when I italicize the names of books the response doesn't always show the title. Marie Clay's books: An Observation Survey, Running Records for Classroom Teachers.
13 days ago
Topic:
Do we count pronunciation as an error?

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 169
Jennifer Jinks wrote:
It seems that mispronounced words are being counted in running records as errors. Could anyone at Fountas and Pinnell please clarify if pronunciation should be counted as an error or not?

The standards were established by Marie Clay in developing Running Records. In An Observation Survey, p. 64 (2002 edition) #8 a) Broken words. where a word is pronounced as two words (for example a/way) even when this is backed up by pointing as if it were two words, this is regarded as an error of pronunciation, not as a reading error unless what is said is matched to a different word. b) Childish pronunciations such as 'pitcher' for picture' and 'gonna' for going to' are counted as correct.
These exact words were used in Running Records for Classroom Teachers (2000)

The BAS Guides for Coding and Scoring Reading Records do not mention this because it is so rare. The most common word questioned is 'de' for 'the' or other words with the /th/ cluster. These are really more articulation errors than pronunciation. Articulation or speech impediments do not count as reading errors. The BAS books were developed with care not to use words that children often mispronounce like 'spaghetti' to avoid this pronunciation problem. However, there could be a child who mispronounces a word in everyday language for which this is an issue. If this is showing up, I would use Dr. Clay's definition for scoring.

I hope this clarifies the problem for you. If you have a specific example I would be happy to help.
Best wishes for success!
Debbie
13 days ago
Topic:
Mature Topics for Immature Readers

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 169
Jomyrol wrote:
I have readers in grade three who are at the U - Z levels. I find the content is too mature and they can't relate to it. i.e. We live in a small town in Canada, where segregation and discrimination are words they have not been exposed to or have connections with. The comprehension is lost when they come upon words like this. The story on Mrs. King Jr.requires connections and background knowledge, such as what the Civil War was. Can you recommend any other stories I could use for bench marking an eight year old with?
Thanks,
Joanne

It is not recommended that you use BAS books more than one grade level above the age of the child for the very reasons stated. The student may read the words but is not really comprehending at the level of complexity required to successfully read at that level. I would only use the level where the child reads accurately enough and comprehends with fluent reading to measure in the proficient- approaching proficiency range for the Independent and Instructional levels for the Benchmark period (use the criteria in BAS to make this determination). The Assessment Summary should detail the goals of instruction for the level that is appropriate for instruction in the "just challenging" level of complexity of texts. Pay close attention to the Text Characteristics and goals for thinking Beyond and About the text to prioritize learning goals. We have to help educate the public that numbers (or letters) alone are not a reliable standard measure for growth. The thinking wrapped up in that number or letter is the important thing!

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
13 days ago
Topic:
Do we count pronunciation as an error?

Jennifer Jinks
Jennifer Jinks
Posts: 1
It seems that mispronounced words are being counted in running records as errors. Could anyone at Fountas and Pinnell please clarify if pronunciation should be counted as an error or not?
13 days ago
Topic:
Mature Topics for Immature Readers

Jomyrol
Jomyrol
Posts: 1
I have readers in grade three who are at the U - Z levels. I find the content is too mature and they can't relate to it. i.e. We live in a small town in Canada, where segregation and discrimination are words they have not been exposed to or have connections with. The comprehension is lost when they come upon words like this. The story on Mrs. King Jr.requires connections and background knowledge, such as what the Civil War was. Can you recommend any other stories I could use for bench marking an eight year old with?
Thanks,
Joanne
14 days ago
Topic:
Benchmark Assessment

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 169
FPUser6968 wrote:
Just recently, we have been noticing some students on the Benchmark Assessment have been independent at one level, then when tested on the level above are coming up frustrational. Should we use the frustrational level as the instructional level? It doesn't make sense to keep instructing those students at their independent level. Any insight that can be given would be greatly appreciated.

We would never want to ask a child to read independently at a level that is too hard. Research shows that this is not productive. However, finding 3 levels of difficulty can be tricky for many various reasons. Section 3 in the Assessment Guide explains why we cannot rely solely on the scores to make the placement decisions- "Looking Beyond the Numbers." It is the analysis that drives the decision for placement for instruction. The factors listed in this section lead to the next called "Looking More Closely at Benchmark Text Reading" which includes Analyzing the Sources of Information and "When the Numbers Don't Line Up Perfectly" with Figure 3.7. This part of your Assessment Guide will provide the guidance you need for these students and really all of your students. This is where the power of the Benchmark Assessment System begins for all students!

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
14 days ago
Topic:
Comprehension Conversation Acceptable Answers

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 169
ALynnRock wrote:
Hello, My district is currently bench marking students for the end of the year. There is a question whether or not teachers who are administering the assessment can accept any answers that are applicable to the questions or do the students have to say exactly what is the section Key Understandings?

For example. in the text Dog Stories, Level L one of the prompts says "Do you think what happened in Dog Stories could really happen? Why (not)?"
Many students are responding with "Yes it could happen in real life because when you write a letter to someone, they can write you back." Is this an acceptable answer? Or do all answers have to be what is listed in the book under Key Understandings?

Thank you for letting me know and helping me with this confusion!

I think p. 26 of the BAS 1 3rd edition Assessment Guide answers your question. (right hand column) "Remember, you are not looking for word-for-word repetition of the understanding, but rather for good evidence that he understands the key idea." So the key understanding listed on the form: "This story could really happen because kids like to write letters to their favorite authors and sometimes the authors will write back." certainly seems to be in line with the sample you provided. Children do not have to provide ALL of the key understandings to get a score of 3 or 2 at Level L. The rubric uses the words "most" or "many" because it is not an exact numerical match for scoring the conversation. It may be helpful for the teachers to revisit this section of the Assessment Guide as they prepare to score the comprehension conversations.

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
14 days ago
Topic:
Comprehension Conversation Acceptable Answers

ALynnRock
ALynnRock
Posts: 1
Hello, My district is currently bench marking students for the end of the year. There is a question whether or not teachers who are administering the assessment can accept any answers that are applicable to the questions or do the students have to say exactly what is the section Key Understandings?

For example. in the text Dog Stories, Level L one of the prompts says "Do you think what happened in Dog Stories could really happen? Why (not)?"
Many students are responding with "Yes it could happen in real life because when you write a letter to someone, they can write you back." Is this an acceptable answer? Or do all answers have to be what is listed in the book under Key Understandings?

Thank you for letting me know and helping me with this confusion!
14 days ago
Topic:
Benchmark Assessment

FPUser6968
FPUser6968
Posts: 1
Just recently, we have been noticing some students on the Benchmark Assessment have been independent at one level, then when tested on the level above are coming up frustrational. Should we use the frustrational level as the instructional level? It doesn't make sense to keep instructing those students at their independent level. Any insight that can be given would be greatly appreciated.
15 days ago
Topic:
Student goes page by page for Within Text Summary

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 169
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
FPUser3996 wrote:
Debbie, I would like the Comprehension Rubric. I wasn't able to find it in the Resource Library: only found a video.

The new rubric is part of the BAS 3rd edition Assessment Guide. It is also under the Online Resources for the 3rd edition. Do you still have contact with the consultant who did your BAS training or a sales rep who might be able to access it for you?


Were you able to find it in the BAS webinar in the resource library?
http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/163




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