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4 hours ago
Topic:
Combining Levels

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 266
leochic06 wrote:
Hi All!

I am an interventionist in my building. I am new to using the BAS assessment program. Currently at my school they have very small groups (1-2) students. If I were to combine levels what is the best strategy for doing so? I have heard you don't want to combine groups that have significant gains in complexity. How do I know what levels are ok to combine together if at all possible?

Thanks!


Refer to the Literacy Continuum as you analyze the strengths and areas of need for your students. Look more closely at the behaviors than the letters of the levels. Usually one level below or above can be combined, beginning instruction with texts at the lowest instructional level in the group.
Best wishes for success!
Debbie
4 hours ago
Topic:
Data Collection within a Responsive Classroom

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 266
FPUser24328 wrote:
Is there a recommended way to keep track of what we've taught?



While each classroom is being responsive, we do want to make sure that we're addressing all of the standards within each grade level.



The data collection is dependent on the purpose and requirements in each situation. You can find examples throughout Fountas and Pinnell's professional learning tools but they are purposefully vague in most instances. Checklists are popular for tracking teaching in many instructional contexts. You may find some helpful examples in the Facebook group. https://www.facebook.com/groups/FountasPinnell/

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
4 hours ago
Topic:
Common Language for Skills / Strategies

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 266
FPUser24328 wrote:
Hello,

We're working on tightening up the common language we use vertically. Where in the continuum would we find a specific list of these skills/strategies that should be explicitly taught for each grade level?



The entire Continuum lists the goals and expectations for every grade level in each of the instructional contexts. If you are talking about when to begin calling "the people in the book characters" kinds of talk you might find Figure 16-8 in Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency helpful. It is called "Acquiring a Shared Literary Vocabulary for Talking About Books." This is in the chapter on "Creating a Literate Culture Through Interactive Read-Aloud." These are the goals you will find in that section of the Continuum (IRA) as well as the Oral Communication section.
If I am misunderstanding your question please provide more information and I'll try again.
Best wishes for success!
Debbie
5 hours ago
Topic:
Explicit Instruction

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 266
FPUser24328 wrote:
Hello,

Our teachers are struggling with the lack of "explicit instruction" within interactive read aloud and shared reading. They are used to providing students with definitions of the strategies and then focusing on one strategy at a time. What kind of evidence / rationale can you provide that would help them better understand the F & P philosophy of abandoning the "one strategy a week" approach to reading instruction?

Or --- is there explicit instruction somewhere we're missing? (By explicit instruction, I mean anchor charts, teacher modeling, etc.)





Fountas and Pinnell address the rationale for teaching children how to think before, during, and after reading using responsive teaching actions in the second edition of Guided Reading. Fountas and Pinnell (p. 361-363, 472 specifically) state the teacher's goal is to teach in a way that supports the reader in constructing strategic actions. Quoting Dr. Marie Clay "Acts of reading are acts of construction, not instruction." There are neural systems that are employed in this complex act of reading that cannot be done "one at a time" so to teach children one strategy at a time is not helpful (or authentic to the task). "That's not the way effective reading works." This text describes the teaching needed in a responsive literacy framework with a focus on guided reading. Interactive read-aloud and Shared reading are part of the scaffolding for this instruction model and excerpts for teaching are included in this volume.

However the new FP Classroom provides explicit lessons for these instructional contexts. FPC provides exactly what you are asking for. Please explore these fabulous new materials. http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/fpc/

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
6 hours ago
Topic:
Combining Levels

leochic06
leochic06
Posts: 1
leochic06
leochic06
Posts: 1
Topic: Combining Levels
Hi All!

I am an interventionist in my building. I am new to using the BAS assessment program. Currently at my school they have very small groups (1-2) students. If I were to combine levels what is the best strategy for doing so? I have heard you don't want to combine groups that have significant gains in complexity. How do I know what levels are ok to combine together if at all possible?

Thanks!
7 hours ago
Topic:
Data Collection within a Responsive Classroom

FPUser24328
FPUser24328
Posts: 4
Is there a recommended way to keep track of what we've taught?



While each classroom is being responsive, we do want to make sure that we're addressing all of the standards within each grade level.
7 hours ago
Topic:
Common Language for Skills / Strategies

FPUser24328
FPUser24328
Posts: 4
Hello,

We're working on tightening up the common language we use vertically. Where in the continuum would we find a specific list of these skills/strategies that should be explicitly taught for each grade level?
7 hours ago
Topic:
Explicit Instruction

FPUser24328
FPUser24328
Posts: 4
Hello,

Our teachers are struggling with the lack of "explicit instruction" within interactive read aloud and shared reading. They are used to providing students with definitions of the strategies and then focusing on one strategy at a time. What kind of evidence / rationale can you provide that would help them better understand the F & P philosophy of abandoning the "one strategy a week" approach to reading instruction?

Or --- is there explicit instruction somewhere we're missing? (By explicit instruction, I mean anchor charts, teacher modeling, etc.)
7 hours ago
Topic:
Benchmark for Advanced Students

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 266
linda.weiner@valleycentralschools.org wrote:
Does this mean one grade level of expectations or one level of text?


I am not sure what you are asking. Does what mean one grade level or text level?
9 hours ago
Topic:
Benchmark for Advanced Students

linda.weiner@valleycentralschools.org
linda.weiner@valleycentralschools.org
Posts: 2
Does this mean one grade level of expectations or one level of text?
1 days ago
Topic:
Consonant Cluster and Blend Chart

Rocking in Reading
Rocking in Reading
Posts: 3
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Rocking in Reading wrote:
Hi,
I am working with a group of First graders with LLI and starting lesson 61. As I was reviewing the goals it mention discussing consonant clusters and blends. I have been doing the alphabet linking chart with my students. So, based on the mention of the consonant clusters and blends, is this now when I should introduce the Consonant Cluster Chart? or is that for Second Grade? If anyone can clarify for me that would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks a million!


When you have these questions it is best to go to the Literacy Continuum. I assume Lesson 61 is in the Green system which is beginning level F. Reading the alphabet linking chart shifts to reading the consonant linking chart at Level E in the Planning for Word Work after Guided Reading section. So in LLI the consonant linking chart is introduced with Level E when teaching students to notice consonant clusters. I do not see specific teaching language in edition 1 to use the linking chart but it is implied when asking students to notice consonant clusters you could link to the chart beginning with lesson 51. In edition 2 the principle begins with specific language in lesson 58.

Thank you for your question. Best wishes for success!
Debbie




Thank you so much for your quick reply Debbie - I really appreciate that. It makes complete sense and confirms my thinking. I will also check the Literacy Continuum :)
1 days ago
Topic:
Consonant Cluster and Blend Chart

Rocking in Reading
Rocking in Reading
Posts: 3
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Rocking in Reading wrote:
Hi,
I am working with a group of First graders with LLI and starting lesson 61. As I was reviewing the goals it mention discussing consonant clusters and blends. I have been doing the alphabet linking chart with my students. So, based on the mention of the consonant clusters and blends, is this now when I should introduce the Consonant Cluster Chart? or is that for Second Grade? If anyone can clarify for me that would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks a million!


When you have these questions it is best to go to the Literacy Continuum. I assume Lesson 61 is in the Green system which is beginning level F. Reading the alphabet linking chart shifts to reading the consonant linking chart at Level E in the Planning for Word Work after Guided Reading section. So in LLI the consonant linking chart is introduced with Level E when teaching students to notice consonant clusters. I do not see specific teaching language in edition 1 to use the linking chart but it is implied when asking students to notice consonant clusters you could link to the chart beginning with lesson 51. In edition 2 the principle begins with specific language in lesson 58.

Thank you for your question. Best wishes for success!
Debbie
3 days ago
Topic:
LLI and kindergartners

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 266
FPUser15268 wrote:
Hello! We are beginning to form our groups for LLI with our kindergarten classes. Our students range from knowing just a few letters and sounds, to knowing all but a few letters and sounds (think emerging K vs. emerging reader). Is there specific criteria (or a little guidance) as to how to decide which students should be placed in a group? We've completed the BAS on all students and we have more <A readers than spots in LLI. On another note, we are looking at addressing the problem at the core, tier 1, but we just want to get the most bang for our buck right now.


In order to form groups analyze the assessments with the Literacy Continuum for Guided Reading Level A, the Oral Communication section, and the Phonics section (especially Early Literacy Concepts). Students who are reading below Level A means they have not learned the language and story awareness from IRA experiences or ELC from the Shared Reading experiences in whole group lessons. Level A is not about knowing all of the letters and sounds. Once students know all of the letters they should be ready for reading Level E. Get to know the goals in the Continuum and you may be surprised that you really don't have so many who need LLI.

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
3 days ago
Topic:
Reading Aloud vs Reading Silently

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 266
Bay City Public Schools wrote:
I have a K-2 special education teacher using LLI with her students. She and I recently had a conversation over the fact that she 1st taught her three students using green level D (as an example). After completing all the lessons for that level in the green and after assessment it was determined that repeating the level D using the orange system would benefit the students.
She is now at the end of the level, assessed the students again, and not enough progress was made to move on to the next level. She is considering repeating level D green with her students again.

What would you recommend she do?


For students not making progress a deeper analysis as to why needs to take place. Using the Guide for Observing and Noting Reading Behaviors a very specific analysis should be made of the students' behaviors. The Teacher Lesson Reflection resource should be used to analyze the teaching. Use chapter 3 of When Readers Struggle for further ideas about where the students are having difficulty and the kind of teaching they might need. There are chapters in the rest of the WRS text that address each of the ten areas of difficulty described in chapter 3. It is critical that students not making progress after 30 or more lessons (6 weeks) at one level have this deeper analysis.

When I had students who did not seem to make accelerated progress after 2 weeks I asked a colleague to observe me teaching, for another set of eyes to observe the students and my teaching. Sometimes we don't notice when our language is not facilitating learning but others can help us notice it. Dr. Marie Clay once helped me see that my language, although it was appropriate prompting, was confusing a child rather than helping in that situation.

The other comment I picked up on is "not making enough progress." Look in the Continuum for the shifts that must be made for successful reading from level D to E. Many behaviors are still taught at Level E with just a few shifts. Focus the goals for the lessons on what is keeping the students from moving to level E. If the focus is just on accurate reading or scores on reading records that is not enough to hold students back in lessons. Use the Continuum and deeper analysis to help accelerate the learning even for students with some learning disabilities. The modifications in the students IEPs should be used for the lessons and assessments.

I hope this helps provide some next steps to try. If you need help with the analysis I can help with that.
Best wishes for success!
Debbie
3 days ago
Topic:
Non-Fiction Text Features and Impact on Word Count

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 266
JameeCallahan wrote:
When our students read the nonfiction BAS texts, many of them read the various text features provided (captions, sidebars, etc...). This impacts the word count and their words per minute scores. Is there a suggestion about how to use this positive reading behavior to 'credit' a student's efforts for the final assessment score? Wondering if others have had similar experiences.
edited by JameeCallahan on 1/19/2018

I have answered this question before but others may share their experiences too.
The wpm rates are ranges to take into account such "extras" without penalizing a student. If they are spending too long on the features it is good to note the behavior so teaching for more efficient reading can take place. The actual fluency rubric score is not based on wpm alone so it should not impact the final assessment score.

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
3 days ago
Topic:
Consonant Cluster and Blend Chart

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 266
Rocking in Reading wrote:
Hi,
I am working with a group of First graders with LLI and starting lesson 61. As I was reviewing the goals it mention discussing consonant clusters and blends. I have been doing the alphabet linking chart with my students. So, based on the mention of the consonant clusters and blends, is this now when I should introduce the Consonant Cluster Chart? or is that for Second Grade? If anyone can clarify for me that would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks a million!


When you have these questions it is best to go to the Literacy Continuum. I assume Lesson 61 is in the Green system which is beginning level F. Reading the alphabet linking chart shifts to reading the consonant linking chart at Level E in the Planning for Word Work after Guided Reading section. So in LLI the consonant linking chart is introduced with Level E when teaching students to notice consonant clusters. I do not see specific teaching language in edition 1 to use the linking chart but it is implied when asking students to notice consonant clusters you could link to the chart beginning with lesson 51. In edition 2 the principle begins with specific language in lesson 58.

Thank you for your question. Best wishes for success!
Debbie
3 days ago
Topic:
Decoding Strategy Question

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 266
apalazzi22 wrote:
Hi Everyone,

I am a Literacy Coach, and one of my BSI teachers has a student in LLI who has always had severe difficulties decoding and accuracy scores were always below 95%. She would sound out sight words, etc, but was extremely strong at self-correcting and monitoring for meaning. The student is a fifth grader.

Recently, she began using a strategy where she would sound out the word in her head, reread the phrase in her head, and then finally read out loud. The teacher reports that her accuracy is higher than it has ever been, but her comprehension is now suffering.

I feel that she is most definitely utilizing too much of her working memory on accuracy and decoding words and now is unable to monitor for meaning. Any cases like this that you have seen? What strategies can I offer in order to best meet the needs of this student?


It sounds like you have analyzed this student well. Has the student been diagnosed with a memory processing issue for an IEP? For instruction the student should only read out loud after being allowed to read silently. For LLI lessons the teacher should allow the student to read silently and listen in on a rereading of that page as needed. Then the group would hold the comprehension discussion as usual. When the student is then asked to read orally for the reading record it should be on the text already read silently which should not impede the accuracy or comprehension. Only for the interval assessments would the modification need to be followed and documented.

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
4 days ago
Topic:
LLI and kindergartners

FPUser15268
FPUser15268
Posts: 4
Hello! We are beginning to form our groups for LLI with our kindergarten classes. Our students range from knowing just a few letters and sounds, to knowing all but a few letters and sounds (think emerging K vs. emerging reader). Is there specific criteria (or a little guidance) as to how to decide which students should be placed in a group? We've completed the BAS on all students and we have more <A readers than spots in LLI. On another note, we are looking at addressing the problem at the core, tier 1, but we just want to get the most bang for our buck right now.
4 days ago
Topic:
Reading Aloud vs Reading Silently

Bay City Public Schools
Bay City Public Schools
Posts: 1
I have a K-2 special education teacher using LLI with her students. She and I recently had a conversation over the fact that she 1st taught her three students using green level D (as an example). After completing all the lessons for that level in the green and after assessment it was determined that repeating the level D using the orange system would benefit the students.
She is now at the end of the level, assessed the students again, and not enough progress was made to move on to the next level. She is considering repeating level D green with her students again.

What would you recommend she do?
4 days ago
Topic:
Non-Fiction Text Features and Impact on Word Count

JameeCallahan
JameeCallahan
Posts: 1
When our students read the nonfiction BAS texts, many of them read the various text features provided (captions, sidebars, etc...). This impacts the word count and their words per minute scores. Is there a suggestion about how to use this positive reading behavior to 'credit' a student's efforts for the final assessment score? Wondering if others have had similar experiences.
edited by JameeCallahan on 1/19/2018




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