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FPUser59266
FPUser59266
Posts: 1


7/23/2018
FPUser59266
FPUser59266
Posts: 1
How do I challenge my students reading above grade level during shared reading in a first and second grade classroom?
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 540


7/24/2018
FPUser59266 wrote:
How do I challenge my students reading above grade level during shared reading in a first and second grade classroom?


There is no set answer for this question, it depends. The best response I can think of is to look in the Literacy Continuum for the goals and expectations those students are ready to learn and pose prompts for their thinking toward those goals.
Keep in mind that one of the main goals of the shared reading experience is the "community experience" so all of the class is sharing in learning from each other's talk about their thinking. Even students reading above grade level independently will be able to learn from the discussion of all levels of readers in this shared experience as well as helping to lift the thinking for their classmates. The collaboration is key. In my experience there have been some students who can read very well but are not as good in sharing their thinking so this is a time to develop some discussion skills in a safe community environment. Check out the Oral Communication and Literature Discussion goals in the Literacy Continuum as well as the Shared Reading goals.

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
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carlew
carlew
Posts: 2


2/17/2019
carlew
carlew
Posts: 2
Will the use of text set at higher reading levels during shared reading put students reading at grade level or below at a disadvantage
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carlew
carlew
Posts: 2


2/17/2019
carlew
carlew
Posts: 2
Can anyone point me to some clarity on the "Literacy Block"? Not sure how to tie in instruction in Language Arts areas after the shared reading activity. If, for example, you want to teach the use of quotation marks must this skill be identified in the text used for shared reading?
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702


2/18/2019
carlew wrote:
Will the use of text set at higher reading levels during shared reading put students reading at grade level or below at a disadvantage


Please refer to the Literacy Continuum for the best description of shared reading text features you need to include in texts chosen for your grade level. Shared Reading requires more support from the teacher, with students joining in to read with the teacher usually on the second reading of the text. This allows below grade level and at grade level readers time to hear, see and understand the message of the text. Revisiting the text for Minilessons allow you to point out strategies used while reading. Guided Reading Responsive Teaching Across the Grades has an excellent description of Shared Reading, how it brings readers to a new level of accessing print and will give you direction in ‘how to approach’ the instructional process of Shared Reading. In addition, it will show how to use Shared Reading as a segway into Guided Reading in early elementary. The Literacy Continuum will help you establish goals for using shared reading with your grade level.

Wishing you success in using Shared Reading with your students,

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702


2/18/2019
carlew wrote:
Can anyone point me to some clarity on the "Literacy Block"? Not sure how to tie in instruction in Language Arts areas after the shared reading activity. If, for example, you want to teach the use of quotation marks must this skill be identified in the text used for shared reading?



If you want to do a mini lesson on quotation marks, you could include several past books or poems that have been shared with the group and note the use of quotation marks in each of the texts. You need to use clear explicit examples. You could even carry this over to Interactive writing for reinforcement. Then take every opportunity to explicitly share / demonstrate the concept of quotation marks in small group guided reading. This allows children to ‘see’ quotation marks in multi texts. Once again, the priority on what to teach and when should be based on the Literacy Continuum Behaviors to Notice, Teach and Support at your grade level and/or the gradient text level of your small group.

Wishing you success with your Minilessons,
edited by Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant on 2/18/2019

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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