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Book Introductions Messages in this topic - RSS

Tam
Tam
Posts: 7


9/23/2018
Tam
Tam
Posts: 7

I have a question about book introductions in guided reading. I realize that there are 2 purposes for a book introduction.


The first reason is to ensure that the student has a successful first read of the new book (it's a scaffold- tailored just for this student or group of students- for an instructional level book- that would be just beyond the student's independent reading level).


The second purpose is that the student is being taught a strategy of how to introduce him/herself to books before reading.


Some leaders in the educational field are stressing the goal of independence during guided reading and as a consequence, I am concerned that this scaffold will be removed- or designated to a prompting session, trying to guide the student's "independent searching" (guessing game of what do you notice) to an informative book introduction.


I am also reading thoughts, where some teachers believe that student's should be introducing themselves to books by level O.


So my questions are:


During guided reading, Is there a level at which this scaffold is pulled away a only a minimal level of support is offered?


Can you clarify this for me?


edited by Tam on 9/23/2018
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 747


9/24/2018
Tam wrote:

I have a question about book introductions in guided reading. I realize that there are 2 purposes for a book introduction.


The first reason is to ensure that the student has a successful first read of the new book (it's a scaffold- tailored just for this student or group of students- for an instructional level book- that would be just beyond the student's independent reading level).


The second purpose is that the student is being taught a strategy of how to introduce him/herself to books before reading.


Some leaders in the educational field are stressing the goal of independence during guided reading and as a consequence, I am concerned that this scaffold will be removed- or designated to a prompting session, trying to guide the student's "independent searching" (guessing game of what do you notice) to an informative book introduction.


I am also reading thoughts, where some teachers believe that student's should be introducing themselves to books by level O.


So my questions are:


During guided reading, Is there a level at which this scaffold is pulled away a only a minimal level of support is offered?


Can you clarify this for me?


edited by Tam on 9/23/2018



No, students always deserve some kind of introduction when being instructed in guided reading. If the introduction is totally taken away it is now independent reading, not guided reading. Anyone who says to take away the book introduction is not following the framework for guided reading developed by Fountas and Pinnell. They do not understand the purpose of guided reading, they may be teaching in small groups, but it is not guided reading. See the article by Fountas and Pinnell called Guided Reading: the Romance and the Reality. http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/181 The Literacy Continuum provides many behaviors that should be taught at each level, O to Z included.

Thank you for searching to be a loyal guided reading teacher.
Debbie
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