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Discuss Leveled Literacy Intervention and the LLI supporting resources.

Comprehension Questions Per Level Messages in this topic - RSS

Southwest Michigan
Southwest Michigan
Posts: 16


11/19/2018
This is our first year using the LLI system and now we're just beginning to use prompting guide #2. I see how the guide is divided and particularly with green tab prompts for the systems of strategic actions.

As we're working with upper grade level LLI groups we're noticing many of our groups don't have the ability at this point to to carry on comprehension discussions within the group they're in---- beyond more than just basic comprehension questions.

Does Fountas and Pinnell have specific comprehension questions----per level (A to Z) to guide adults as they work with their students in addition to the prompts in Section II?

The Literacy Continuum has the goals broken down into within the text, beyond the text, and about the text but I haven't found any specific questions to ask per area there either.

Should I just be concentrating on the comprehension questions in the prompting guide?
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 511


11/19/2018
Southwest Michigan wrote:
This is our first year using the LLI system and now we're just beginning to use prompting guide #2. I see how the guide is divided and particularly with green tab prompts for the systems of strategic actions.

As we're working with upper grade level LLI groups we're noticing many of our groups don't have the ability at this point to to carry on comprehension discussions within the group they're in---- beyond more than just basic comprehension questions.

Does Fountas and Pinnell have specific comprehension questions----per level (A to Z) to guide adults as they work with their students in addition to the prompts in Section II?

The Literacy Continuum has the goals broken down into within the text, beyond the text, and about the text but I haven't found any specific questions to ask per area there either.

Should I just be concentrating on the comprehension questions in the prompting guide?



LLI lessons are intervention lessons that supplement classroom instruction. Learning how to talk about texts is part of the classroom instruction during Interactive Read-Aloud and Literature Discussion; Shared and Performance Reading, Reading Minilessons, Book Clubs, Independent Reading Conferences, as well as Guided Reading in small groups beginning in Kindergarten. The Literacy Continuum, Expanded Edition (http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/professionalbooks/) provides the goals and expectations for teaching this kind of language throughout the literacy framework for each grade level. The classroom resources for each instructional context in Fountas and Pinnell Classroom provides more guidance for teaching students how to talk about texts. (http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/intro) You may not be able to teach all of these behaviors in the LLI lessons alone.

Prompting Guide 2 is devoted to the language to use when teaching for thinking beyond and about texts. The students do not need questions, but guided talk in conversations to help them learn to articulate their thinking. The goals in the Continuum should give you an idea of the kind of thinking you may need to model or prompt students to engage in, not questions that require specific answers. PrG2 does not provide specific language to demonstrate, prompt or reinforce like PrG 1. Once teachers are familiar with how the facilitative language works you put the prompts into the format you need. A study guide for Prompting Guide 2 can be found at http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/267.

Each lesson in LLI provides the key understandings for thinking within, beyond, and about the text for every text introduced. The Reading Records provide prompts to guide conversations so you can check each student's understanding/comprehension of every instructional leveled text. Every Discussion section of lessons has some suggested language for teachers to use in guiding the comprehension conversations after reading, when revisiting texts for a purpose, and in preparation for writing about reading. I am not sure why you would need more questions.

For students who have not been taught how to talk about texts in previous years, it might be helpful to share the Prompting Guide 2 section on Book Discussions with classroom teachers. I have pulled a few sentence stems to create a "discussion card" to give to students as reminder while they are engaging in discussion groups. They could be on an anchor chart in the classroom. Once they internalize those, choose a few new ones.

Best wishes as you engage students in book discussions!
Debbie
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