Skip to main content
search navigation

HomeIntervention

Discuss Leveled Literacy Intervention and the LLI supporting resources.

Developing speech pattern errors Messages in this topic - RSS

User 464552
User 464552
Posts: 8


9/22/2011
User 464552
User 464552
Posts: 8
Are mispronunciations due to developing speech patterns - such as saying, "psketti" for "spaghetti," or "capertiller" for "caterpillar" considered errors? In these cases, I feel as though the child knows the correct word, but is unable to pronounce it correctly. So - error or not?
0 link
The Fountas & Pinnell Team
The Fountas & Pinnell Team
Posts: 292


9/27/2011
No error for pronunciation or dialect.

--
The Fountas & Pinnell Team

Fountas & Pinnell Homepage
Fountas & Pinnell Blog
Fountas & Pinnell on Facebook
Fountas & Pinnell on Twitter
email the Fountas & Pinnell Team
0 link
Emily F. (Moderator)
Emily F. (Moderator)
Administrator
Posts: 59


9/27/2011
Emily F. (Moderator)
Emily F. (Moderator)
Administrator
Posts: 59
Hi there -- I'm going to move this thread from "Start Your Own Discussion Thread" to "Fountas and Pinnell" so that others interested in the subject will be more likely to see it. Thank you for posting it!
0 link
cossette
cossette
Posts: 18


10/19/2011
cossette
cossette
Posts: 18
What about ELL students and word endings? The omission or addition of an "s" or other ending can wreck the accuracy percentage. Should it be scored like a proper noun or a TOLD or not counted as an error at all?
0 link
The Fountas & Pinnell Team
The Fountas & Pinnell Team
Posts: 292


10/21/2011
You would score the omission of a word ending (tree for trees) as an error, but in your analysis of the running/reading record, you would take into account the fact that the student is a second language learner, and base your decision on instructional level with this information in mind. Reading, writing, and continued exposure to the English language will eventually alleviate the problem.

There is an excellent chapter (Chapter 18) in When Readers Struggle: "Working Successfully with English Language Learners." Fountas & Pinnell state on p. 450,
"You can also use dictated and independent writing to help English language learners learn about the formation of sentences and individual vocabulary words in English. Dictation relieves the writers of the act of composition. They can concentrate on constructing the words, one after another. They reread the sentence many times, which helps them internalize syntactic patterns that are acceptable in English."


--
The Fountas & Pinnell Team

Fountas & Pinnell Homepage
Fountas & Pinnell Blog
Fountas & Pinnell on Facebook
Fountas & Pinnell on Twitter
email the Fountas & Pinnell Team
0 link
FPUser9493
FPUser9493
Posts: 4


6/16/2021
FPUser9493
FPUser9493
Posts: 4
Is this information printed in the Assessment Guide anywhere? The Fountas & Pinnell Team wrote:
No error for pronunciation or dialect.
0 link
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 944


6/17/2021
FPUser9493 wrote:
Is this information printed in the Assessment Guide anywhere? The Fountas & Pinnell Team wrote:
No error for pronunciation or dialect.


Please refer to page 26, Edition 3 of the Benchmark Assessment Guide under the heading: Fluency and English Language Learners…
“Phonetic variations that do not interfere greatly with comprehension or fluency can be ignored. Make judgments based on your knowledge of the student.“


There is no change in 3rd edition with regard to recording errors of all readers. “Errors are coded and scored the same for all readers.” What must be considered is the analysis and placement of the reader. Scores are only one aspect of the assessment. Analysis for placement is key. Please refer to section 3, page 46, Recommended Placement Level. “The errors are coded and scored the same for all readers, including English language learners. However, the analysis should guide the appropriate placement decision by looking beyond the numbers to consider the thinking that was done in reading compared to the expectations along The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum, not just the errors made because of language development.”


The standards were established by Marie Clay in developing Running Records. In An Observation Survey, p. 64 (2002 edition) #8 a) Broken words. where a word is pronounced as two words (for example a/way) even when this is backed up by pointing as if it were two words, this is regarded as an error of pronunciation, not as a reading error unless what is said is matched to a different word. b) Childish pronunciations such as 'pitcher' for picture' and 'gonna' for going to' are [recorded but] counted as correct.
These exact words were used in Running Records for Classroom Teachers (2000)


The BAS Guides for Coding and Scoring Reading Records do not mention this because it is so rare. The most common word questioned is 'de' for 'the' or other words with the /th/ cluster, aks for ask, etc. These are considered a regional or dialect pronunciation and are recorded but not counted as an error. Articulation or speech impediments do not count as reading errors.


The BAS books were developed with care not to use words that children often mispronounce like 'spaghetti' to avoid this pronunciation problem. However, there could be a child who mispronounces a word in everyday language for which this is an issue. If this is showing up, I would use Dr. Clay's definition for scoring.



I hope this clarifies.
Best Wishes,
Helenann

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
0 link





Powered by Jitbit Forum 8.3.8.0 © 2006-2013 Jitbit Software