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5 Harkness Road
5 Harkness Road
Posts: 17


10/2/2019
5 Harkness Road
5 Harkness Road
Posts: 17
My school district currently uses Handwriting Without Tears. That program teachers all the uppercase letters alone first and then moves in to lower case letters. Does F and P have any thoughts or writings about handwriting, beyond the verbal pathways? I am specifically curious about children learning to write their names using only uppercase letters. It would seem that children should be exposed to the actual way names are written, which is with only the first letter being capitalized. Thoughts?
Thanks.
Annie
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 685


10/2/2019
5 Harkness Road wrote:
My school district currently uses Handwriting Without Tears. That program teachers all the uppercase letters alone first and then moves in to lower case letters. Does F and P have any thoughts or writings about handwriting, beyond the verbal pathways? I am specifically curious about children learning to write their names using only uppercase letters. It would seem that children should be exposed to the actual way names are written, which is with only the first letter being capitalized. Thoughts?
Thanks.
Annie



Fountas and Pinnell suggest teaching letter formation in the Phonics, Spelling, Word Study Lessons, in writing workshop, and in any whole class writing lesson. Names are an important part of those lessons. Name puzzles, charts and other activities use the uppercase letter at the beginning and lowercase letters for the rest just as they are usually seen in print.

HWT was developed for special education students. Uppercase letters tend to have fewer variations in strokes and are usually easier to distinguish which may be why the special education program starts with them.

Best wishes!
Debbie
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