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Guided Reading - Timeline Messages in this topic - RSS

DaynaB
DaynaB
Posts: 2


3/9/2021
DaynaB
DaynaB
Posts: 2
I read that the during a guided reading session, teachers should be covering the whole book/lesson (I.e. Introduction, read the book, discuss/revisit and then word work). Many teachers at my school said they do not have enough time during a 20 minute rotation to cover all of it and are dragging the book out for several days. Most say the children take long to read the book independently (that is what is taking the most time). Could there be any other reasons for this? For the discussion and revisiting part, there is a TON of information on that page. I am starting to wonder if perhaps teachers are doing TOO much on that page? Just wondering what the rationale is and why it is important to cover one book during one session and to NOT drag it out all week.

Thank you.
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 802


3/9/2021
DaynaB wrote:
I read that the during a guided reading session, teachers should be covering the whole book/lesson (I.e. Introduction, read the book, discuss/revisit and then word work). Many teachers at my school said they do not have enough time during a 20 minute rotation to cover all of it and are dragging the book out for several days. Most say the children take long to read the book independently (that is what is taking the most time). Could there be any other reasons for this? For the discussion and revisiting part, there is a TON of information on that page. I am starting to wonder if perhaps teachers are doing TOO much on that page? Just wondering what the rationale is and why it is important to cover one book during one session and to NOT drag it out all week.

Thank you.

GR lessons use the framework you have outlined. You can find more information about the lessons in the professional books Guided Reading, the Literacy Continuum, and many more. The following Blog also lists the steps. What is Guided Reading? (fountasandpinnell.com)
http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/181


If teachers are trying to teach a book they are not teaching GR. Well written GR books do contain many of the expected goals within a level, but are short enough to be used with a group for teaching the goals selected by the teacher for the students in the group, not everything a book has to teach. Teachers must be responsive to the group and what needs to be taught today for the students to shift towards more independence with texts of that complexity. However a teacher should NOT try to teach EVERY goal a book has to offer.

I have seen some upper elementary students finish reading longer texts independently before the discussion so teachers can rotate groups in tight schedules. The teacher introduces the text, gets everyone started, listens in a bit, then leaves that group to finish reading silently while she moves to introduce a text or have a discussion with another group. The teacher needs to assess the groups and make those decisions of how and when to gather evidence through observations to guide the selection of goals for the next lesson when schedules are limited. Students need to read MANY different books so a new book for each time the group meets is the norm for GR. Rarely a book might be used for more than one lesson. Often a book is referred to, connections are made, or sometimes revisiting might happen for a particular purpose. If the book is used over a period of days that is a basal lesson not GR.


Best wishes!
Debbie
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