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2 days ago
Topic:
comprehension

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 596
Rekha B wrote:
If a child responds correctly to the comprehension questions in his home language, do we mark them as correct ?



Please see page 27 in your BAS 1 Assessment Guide. In the section under "Comprehension and English Language Learners," it describes completing 2 forms one in the native language and one in English. Both are used for the analysis and placement decision but the English scores are recorded.

Best wishes!
Debbie
2 days ago
Topic:
colored writing journals

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 596
Sue Connolly wrote:
As I learn to use Fountas and Pinnell and look at the resources available here I notice a lot of colored journals. These are writing journals from F and P and are different colored covers. There are red, purple, and yellow. Are there special colors for each grade? How do I know which is which?
~Sue




Since you mention writing and the colors are red, yellow, and purple I think you are seeing the Writing Notebooks that are in the LLI Primary systems. (https://www.fountasandpinnell.com/lli/). All 3 colors come in each primary system. Some teachers use the colors to categorize groups (red group, yellow group, purple group) while others have a different color for each child in a group. There is no special color for a grade. You may use them as you wish.

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
2 days ago
Topic:
comprehension

Rekha B
Rekha B
Posts: 6
Rekha B
Rekha B
Posts: 6
Topic: comprehension
If a child responds correctly to the comprehension questions in his home language, do we mark them as correct ?
3 days ago
Topic:
colored writing journals

Sue Connolly
Sue Connolly
Posts: 1
As I learn to use Fountas and Pinnell and look at the resources available here I notice a lot of colored journals. These are writing journals from F and P and are different colored covers. There are red, purple, and yellow. Are there special colors for each grade? How do I know which is which?
~Sue
9 days ago
Topic:
Spelling Instruction for grades 4 and 5

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 596
FPUser122879 wrote:
I see that grade 5 word study is in development... do you have a date that it is likely to be released?


The production timeline found at http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/364 is the best place to check. It shows "In Development" that materials expected for 2020 or later. Sorry but that is all we know for now. In the meantime, you can use the Continuum PWS section or the Comprehensive Guide for your grade level to select goals with the lesson routines and framework in grade 3 then 4 to teach and apply.

Stay tuned!
Debbie
9 days ago
Topic:
Spelling Instruction for grades 4 and 5

FPUser122879
FPUser122879
Posts: 1
I see that grade 5 word study is in development... do you have a date that it is likely to be released?
10 days ago
Topic:
audio books

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 596
FPUser123999 wrote:
Can anybody tell me if LLI has audiobooks? I found that audiobooks can support fluency.


No, there are no audiobooks in LLI. The books are designed to be used for instruction in small groups.

Best wishes!
Debbie
13 days ago
Topic:
audio books

FPUser123999
FPUser123999
Posts: 1
FPUser123999
FPUser123999
Posts: 1
Topic: audio books
Can anybody tell me if LLI has audiobooks? I found that audiobooks can support fluency.
18 days ago
Topic:
ESL

karishma36
karishma36
Posts: 1
karishma36
karishma36
Posts: 1
Topic: ESL
You did such a great job and I wish for more in future as well. I am glad to be a part of this awesome article.
Delhi Escort
20 days ago
Topic:
Assessment rubrics L-Z and Literacy continuum

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 745
Lizzyread wrote:
This is helpful, thank you. From your explanation, my understanding is that these 3 terms are under one big umbrella.
An author writes a text for the purpose of conveying to the reader the theme/big idea. Authors select the genre in which they want to convey this message.
Everyone always says the author's purpose was either to persuade, inform, or entertain (PIE). Is this just the genre they choose to convey the message?

For the comprehension rubric in BAS 2 students need to demonstrate an understanding of the deeper messages of the text. When nonfiction stories are focused around a topic such as with expository nonfiction, such as the text in Not too Cold for a Polar Bear (level Q NF BAS) or Tsunamis (Level U) the message/theme/big idea is more straight-forward such as Polar Bears are amazing animals in that they can live in the cold. Tsunamis are natural disasters that we have to prepare for.

Is my understanding correct?


Let me start by congratulating you on your deep thinking! I am including additional information from the text, Genre Study by Fountas and Pinnell. I hope it supports as well as extends your continued insights into genre instruction.

From Chapter 10 of Genre Study: “Writers of nonfiction texts have a number of decisions to make as they think about text structure. Depending on purpose, they can use either narrative or non-narrative structure, or a combination of both.”

“These categories [non-narrative text structures: expository, procedural, or persuasive] are helpful in recognizing the types of texts, but we also need to realize that many texts do not fit neatly into one category. A text can be all three—expository, procedural, and persuasive.”

From Chapter 11 of Genre Study: “Themes and ideas. These are the big ideas communicated by the writer. Ideas may be concrete and accessible or complex and abstract. Fiction genres usually communicate a message about human relationships or life. Nonfiction writers also have overarching messages; they may be highly persuasive or guide readers to draw conclusions, form opinions, or develop attitudes from the facts they present.”

From Chapter 4 of Genre Study: “Themes and ideas are the big ideas and messages of the text. The more obvious and concrete they are, the easier they are to understand. Highly abstract and hard-to-grasp themes increase difficulty.”

We wish you success in your instruction around genre study!
21 days ago
Topic:
Assessment rubrics L-Z and Literacy continuum

Lizzyread
Lizzyread
Posts: 5
This is helpful, thank you. From your explanation, my understanding is that these 3 terms are under one big umbrella.
An author writes a text for the purpose of conveying to the reader the theme/big idea. Authors select the genre in which they want to convey this message.
Everyone always says the author's purpose was either to persuade, inform, or entertain (PIE). Is this just the genre they choose to convey the message?

For the comprehension rubric in BAS 2 students need to demonstrate an understanding of the deeper messages of the text. When nonfiction stories are focused around a topic such as with expository nonfiction, such as the text in Not too Cold for a Polar Bear (level Q NF BAS) or Tsunamis (Level U) the message/theme/big idea is more straight-forward such as Polar Bears are amazing animals in that they can live in the cold. Tsunamis are natural disasters that we have to prepare for.

Is my understanding correct?
21 days ago
Topic:
Assessment rubrics L-Z and Literacy continuum

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 745
Lizzyread wrote:
Hi,
I have questions regarding the rubric stating that students need to understand clear understanding of the deeper messages of the text. I am having a difficult time wrapping my head around the difference between:
1)theme
2) message
3) big idea
I have heard these terms used interchangeably and when I search online, I find very different answers.
The Literacy Continuum refers to Messages & Themes under one category for fiction and nonfiction and then under language and literary features it talks about motif.
Are all of these applied to fiction and nonfiction?
My understanding was that the big idea is a global message, which would be the same as message. Theme seems more specific to the text.
Do fiction and nonfiction all have messages?


Fountas and Pinnell state in Genre Study, “The theme (also called the big idea) of a story is the underlying message or messages in the text or the bigger meaning below the story’s surface. The theme reveals the author’s purpose. The big idea is often stated at the end of a story and is sometimes voiced by one of the characters.... Most of the time, themes are not explicitly stated and must be uncovered by the reader....As with many high-quality stories, several themes can be derived from [a story]....We need to help our students become sophisticated enough to identify the main theme of a story or to discern and discuss multiple themes.”

In Nonfiction texts, such as Biographies, Autobiographies and Memoirs, the author’s message or messages relate to the theme (or big idea). In Narrative Nonfiction, the author’s messages provide factual information in narrative style and chronological structure about a particular theme or topic. In Expository Nonfiction, Procedural Texts and Persuasive Texts the information is typically organized around a topic.

Please see Genre Study by Fountas and Pinnell, which is very helpful in distinguishing the characteristics of literature genres.
You have asked a very important question. I hope this information has been helpful.
21 days ago
Topic:
Organizing Materials

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 745
ptosie wrote:
Hi everyone, my school just got the Fountas and Pinnell materials (interactive read aloud and phonics/spelling/word study items specifically) and I was wondering how to best go about organizing the materials to make it the most helpful for daily use while teaching. I teach kindergarten and am super excited to use this for the upcoming school year!

Thank you!


Hi! I am so excited for you! These materials will help in so many ways... lessons are prepared for you and materials will be at your fingertips! YAY! I would suggest you go into the Online Resources under the tab General Resources and watch the video: Getting Started with Interactive Read-Alouds. In the PWS section there is: Unpacking Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study System Guide and Getting Started with PWS. These are great resources to get you started! There are a couple more PDFs located here: https://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/default?type=instructional%20tools that might give additional ideas.

We wish you success in the year ahead!
21 days ago
Topic:
Organizing Materials

ptosie
ptosie
Posts: 1
ptosie
ptosie
Posts: 1
Topic: Organizing Materials
Hi everyone, my school just got the Fountas and Pinnell materials (interactive read aloud and phonics/spelling/word study items specifically) and I was wondering how to best go about organizing the materials to make it the most helpful for daily use while teaching. I teach kindergarten and am super excited to use this for the upcoming school year!

Thank you!
21 days ago
Topic:
Assessment rubrics L-Z and Literacy continuum

Lizzyread
Lizzyread
Posts: 5
Hi,
I have questions regarding the rubric stating that students need to understand clear understanding of the deeper messages of the text. I am having a difficult time wrapping my head around the difference between:
1)theme
2) message
3) big idea
I have heard these terms used interchangeably and when I search online, I find very different answers.
The Literacy Continuum refers to Messages & Themes under one category for fiction and nonfiction and then under language and literary features it talks about motif.
Are all of these applied to fiction and nonfiction?
My understanding was that the big idea is a global message, which would be the same as message. Theme seems more specific to the text.
Do fiction and nonfiction all have messages?
26 days ago
Topic:
Reading Mini Lessons and Common Core

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 745
Cnelson wrote:
I am looking into preordering the Reading mini lessons book for both 5th and 6th grade. Are the mini lessons connected to Common Core standards?


All of the Fountas and Pinnell Systems (including the Reading Mini Lessons) are based on the Literacy Continuum. Information regarding Alignment of Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum, Expanded Edition is linked here: http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/385

This document is organized to show the close connection between each of the continua in The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum and the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy.

Best Wishes,
edited by Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant on 6/22/2019
26 days ago
Topic:
Reading Mini Lessons and Common Core

Cnelson
Cnelson
Posts: 1
I am looking into preordering the Reading mini lessons book for both 5th and 6th grade. Are the mini lessons connected to Common Core standards?
29 days ago
Topic:
F&P and Australian Curriculum

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 745
Richard.Kemp wrote:
I believe that the Fountas and Pinnell system does not align with the Australian Curriculum.
I believe the expectations of the system are greater than the Achievement Standards. I also do not believe that the system matches accurately with PM. I feel that PM expectations are far below the Fountas and Pinnell system.

Am I the only one who see this?


I would suggest that you visit https://www.hmhco.com/forms/contact-international to reach your local Heinemann representative or contact Pearson: http://www.pearsoncanadaschool.com/index.cfm?locator=PS2z3a to discuss this further.

The text gradient and expectations can be seen at this link: http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/270
“This equivalence chart, published in the Benchmark Assessment System Guides and Leveled Literacy Intervention System Guides, includes grade level, Fountas & Pinnell level, basal level, Reading Recovery level, Rigby PM level and DRA2 level. Many publishers provide correlation charts to connect their assessment systems with the Fountas & Pinnell levels identified by using the Benchmark Assessment System.”

This correlation chart includes the Instructional Grade-Level Equivalence information provided by the publishers of Rigby PM. Therefore I believe that your best resource would be to contact the links provided above.

I hope this information helps,
6/19/2019
Topic:
Progress Monitoring

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 745
Rayna wrote:
Rayna wrote:
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Rayna wrote:
Our school has FPC and LLI so we are continuing to use the embedded reading records. One dilemma is what structures are in place to provide the reading record? What are other students doing while the teacher is administering the running records?
edited by Rayna on 6/18/2019


In LLI you will assess only one student in the Even Numbered Lesson. This is a very short period of approximately 5 minutes.

In the Primary Systems (Orange, Green and Blue) during the first part of the lesson the other students reread the text(s) from the previous day. The Program Guide, Section 4, explains this procedure: “In the first part of the lesson, children reread softly the new books that were read the day before.... Reading yes- terday’s new book for the second time helps children process with greater ease the challenges that they may have encountered the day before. Use this time to take a reading record on one child, using the Recording Form or in the LLI Reading Record App for the instructional-level book that was introduced and read the day before.”

In the Intermediate Systems (Red and beyond) the Rereading and Assessment occurs during the second 5 minute component. In the System Guide it states, “While you are assessing the one student, have the other students reread a portion of the same book for a purpose, which is provided in the lesson. The purpose is related to the writing about reading activity they do later in the lesson.“

I hope this helps answer your question.



Thanks for the message. What is the structure for classroom teachers for their guided reading groups?


In the FPC System Guide it states, “After each guided reading lesson, we recommend selecting one student and administering a reading record of the text read on the previous day. Children who are gaining control of literacy concepts at
a slower pace will need more frequent monitoring through the use of more frequent records, possibly as often as once a week . This ongoing data will help you monitor children’s progress as well as inform your instruction.”

Running records (the when, where, and how) are further explained in the professional resource: Guided Reading Responsive Teaching Across the Grades. Once again they are short segments of your day... approximately five minutes and conducted based on your schedule... “Once you have begun the instructional program, use yesterday’s new book (seen text) to take the record. You will be able to determine the appropriateness of the level, the current strengths and needs, and the effects of your teaching. Both you and the student are looking at the same text. The process is quite simple. Watch the student closely as he reads, coding behaviors on a separate form or tap­ ping the screen of your tablet. Do not intervene; your role is that of a neutral ob­ server. When the student needs help to move on, the most neutral thing to do is to say, “you try it” (if he verbally appeals) and then, if he balks, you tell him the word. Following the coding, note how the reading sounds, have a very brief conversation about the meaning, and make a teaching point. This process offers an opportunity to observe what the reader can do on his own without teaching.”

You could do a running record of one student before calling up the rest of the group or at some other point during the day, whatever is most convenient for you. You need to consider your class and your group.

I hope this helps,
6/19/2019
Topic:
F&P and Australian Curriculum

Richard.Kemp
Richard.Kemp
Posts: 1
I believe that the Fountas and Pinnell system does not align with the Australian Curriculum.
I believe the expectations of the system are greater than the Achievement Standards. I also do not believe that the system matches accurately with PM. I feel that PM expectations are far below the Fountas and Pinnell system.

Am I the only one who see this?




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