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3 hours ago
Topic:
Guided Reading

FPUser114303
FPUser114303
Posts: 1
FPUser114303
FPUser114303
Posts: 1
Topic: Guided Reading
How much time should be allowed to get through a guided reading lesson? Is 30 minutes the norm?
2 days ago
Topic:
Spelling

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 531
FPUser113802 wrote:
Does F & P Classrooms suggest using the high-frequency words for spelling?



I am having some difficulty responding because I am not sure what you mean by "for spelling."
Some high frequency words may be included in the word study routines to spell words. You should note that the spelling component of Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study is not the traditional view of rote memorization of spelling words to pass a test on Friday. Spelling means the forming of words from letters. So spelling is really part of writing words; using known to solve when writing unfamiliar words. In the Literacy Continuum you find the spelling goals for each grade level under the Writing context / Conventions.

The focus in all of the lessons is to use many flexible strategic ways to solve words when reading and writing. The high frequency words need to be read and written with accurate spelling. (see the following pages in your Lesson Guide p. 5, 38, Master Lesson Guide suggestions on p. 53, & p. 331 for suggestions of things to consider -page numbers differ in grades 2+). You don't want students to have to stop to solve or decode high frequency words, they need to read them fast with automaticity. Thus learning the visual details of these words is important (and one way is by making and writing them fast = spelling= forming words from letters).


I hope this answers your question.
Best wishes for success!
Debbie
2 days ago
Topic:
Foundational Skills

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 531
FPUser113802 wrote:
Does F & P Classroom address all foundational skills for K-5? If not, do you suggest using a supplementary foundational skills program?



The Literacy Continuum contains all of the behaviors a student should need to become a reader and writer. All of the Fountas and Pinnell resources including FP Classroom, use the Continuum as the heart of instruction. The Continuum goals and expectations are aligned with the CCSS and many other state standards. You can find these under the EXTEND Your Expertise tab/Research and Standards. You can check to make sure these standards align with your school system or state expectations to determine whether anything else is needed but I can't imagine you would need anything else. Check out the blog at this link for more information: https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/why-the-literacy-continuum-is-essential-to-your-literacy-instruction

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
3 days ago
Topic:
Spelling

FPUser113802
FPUser113802
Posts: 2
FPUser113802
FPUser113802
Posts: 2
Topic: Spelling
Does F & P Classrooms suggest using the high-frequency words for spelling?
3 days ago
Topic:
Foundational Skills

FPUser113802
FPUser113802
Posts: 2
Does F & P Classroom address all foundational skills for K-5? If not, do you suggest using a supplementary foundational skills program?
3 days ago
Topic:
Nathan's Reading of The Sleepover Party

JenD12
JenD12
Posts: 2
Thank you!
3 days ago
Topic:
Fluency and BAS

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 531
FPUser42307 wrote:
A second-grade student reads Level L with 98% accuracy and excellent comprehension. However, fluency score was 0-1. Do we continue to test for Instructional Level?


Those are the instructional decisions teachers must make. It would seem to be a good idea to work at that level to build fluent reading before moving to higher levels. However, fluent reading should be taught at any level so if there is a group where this student fits you don't have to be tied to a certain level. Consider what is best for your situation.

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
4 days ago
Topic:
Fluency and BAS

FPUser42307
FPUser42307
Posts: 1
FPUser42307
FPUser42307
Posts: 1
Topic: Fluency and BAS
A second-grade student reads Level L with 98% accuracy and excellent comprehension. However, fluency score was 0-1. Do we continue to test for Instructional Level?
4 days ago
Topic:
Nathan's Reading of The Sleepover Party

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 531
JenD12 wrote:
After watching the video of Nathan reading The Sleepover Party, in the video section of the website, it showed the self-correction rate as 1:8. I only heard 5 errors (98% accuracy) and 2 self-corrections, therefore calculating to a self-correction rate of 1:3.5. Could you tell me his errors and self-corrections that I am missing? Thank you!



The teacher's recording form is in the Printable Resources for the videos so you can see the teacher recorded 7 errors and 1 SC to get the 1:8 SC ratio. It is hard to catch everything when we are not right by the child. Thanks for your diligence!

Debbie
4 days ago
Topic:
Nathan's Reading of The Sleepover Party

JenD12
JenD12
Posts: 2
After watching the video of Nathan reading The Sleepover Party, in the video section of the website, it showed the self-correction rate as 1:8. I only heard 5 errors (98% accuracy) and 2 self-corrections, therefore calculating to a self-correction rate of 1:3.5. Could you tell me his errors and self-corrections that I am missing? Thank you!
4 days ago
Topic:
Level O Fiction The New Girl

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 531
Tam wrote:
So if a student is not familiar with the vocabulary/content (such as a bumper sticker)- are you saying that we can define it for them?
There are other higher level books- that have terms that students are not familiar with- can we define those as well?
Also- what does this mean for our ELL students?



Check the new Guidelines for the Comprehension Conversation. What are you trying to learn about this student? It is not just about the words in the story but how does the student attempt to solve unfamiliar content including words.

To me, "bumper sticker" is one of those terms that a student should infer the meaning from the words (morphological units) In Level O under Thinking Within the Text/Solving Words/Vocabulary students should be able to connect and expand words by connecting to other words. I would think a child has heard someone talk about the bumper of a car and knows what stickers are so could think about what a bumper sticker is from that. If not it gives you information about what the student needs to learn; in this case the label words for parts of a car or how to solve less familiar terms by using what they do know. Also note the goals in the Continuum for Inferring meaning and important information.

Always keep in mind you are trying to gather information that will guide your instructional decisions for thinking, not just for teaching words and phrases.

Best wishes as you observe and assess your students!
Debbie
4 days ago
Topic:
BAS - when to tell the student an unknown word

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 531
Tam wrote:
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Tam wrote:
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
RH wrote:
Could you please reference a page number in the instruction manual that addresses this?


The Coding and Scoring At-A-Glance page provides directions for giving a Told. It is found on the back inside cover and p. 22 in your Assessment Guide (BAS 1 3rd ed) Specific directions for each coding standard can be found in the Professional Development videos in the Online Resources.




Best wishes as you assess students!
Debbie



Which edition do you have? If you didn't find it in the pages referenced in the original message you may have a different edition.
Debbie




Debbie,
If a student is actively processing a word- do we go ahead and tell the word within 3 seconds?
Or
Do we wait until the student stops processing- wait three seconds (silence) and then tell the student the word?
Thanks!



Sorry I must have missed this comment earlier. If it is taking too long to solve then it is not efficient processing, but there is no exact time for giving the Told. The 3 second "rule of thumb" came from Marie Clay's work. She just said "about 3 seconds" so there is no hard fast set amount of time for waiting or giving the Told. The information you are gathering is that the student needs to be more fluent and flexible in solving. Your analysis will provide more information as to whether this is a pattern or only happened once, if there is a pattern of the types of words attempted, a pattern of attempting to solve using one or more sources of information, and so on. So if you feel enough time has lapsed to give you some information then give the Told to keep the assessment moving on so you will be time efficient in administering the assessment.

Keep the analysis in mind as you go!
Debbie
4 days ago
Topic:
Mini Lessons and Interactive Read Aloud Plan

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 531
mrsmcaleer3 wrote:
We have recently been given the Mini Lessons book and the Interactive Read-Aloud and we are trying to lay out a plan for next year. We have noticed that on some of the mini lessons it asks to refer back to 2 or 3 books, which are from different text sets. It does not seem practical to read aloud 2-3 books before one mini-lesson in one day. Is there a cohesive plan for the two programs to work together? We have the suggested pacing guides for both, but the books needed for the mini-lessons are in different text sets.



Those are suggestions that if you have read those texts in other lessons to refer to them. You may use any texts that you have read for making the connection or whatever the suggestion is. When doing a minilesson you don't read the entire text of those read before but just a part that provides an example of the minilesson objective. You often will read parts of a few texts to provide a variety of examples for the minilesson. The professional development videos may provide helpful hints about using the lessons in more integrated ways. Check out the following links to help you get started.
http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/414
https://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/default?type=videos
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/faq-friday-is-there-a-suggested-sequence-of-reading-minilessons
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/what-are-reading-minilessons
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/hs-search-results?term=Minilessons
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/what-is-interactive-read-aloud

https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/the-importance-of-a-multi-text-approach-to-literacy-instruction

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
4 days ago
Topic:
Mini Lessons and Interactive Read Aloud Plan

mrsmcaleer3
mrsmcaleer3
Posts: 1
We have recently been given the Mini Lessons book and the Interactive Read-Aloud and we are trying to lay out a plan for next year. We have noticed that on some of the mini lessons it asks to refer back to 2 or 3 books, which are from different text sets. It does not seem practical to read aloud 2-3 books before one mini-lesson in one day. Is there a cohesive plan for the two programs to work together? We have the suggested pacing guides for both, but the books needed for the mini-lessons are in different text sets.
4 days ago
Topic:
BAS - when to tell the student an unknown word

Tam
Tam
Posts: 5
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Tam wrote:
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
RH wrote:
Could you please reference a page number in the instruction manual that addresses this?


The Coding and Scoring At-A-Glance page provides directions for giving a Told. It is found on the back inside cover and p. 22 in your Assessment Guide (BAS 1 3rd ed) Specific directions for each coding standard can be found in the Professional Development videos in the Online Resources.




Best wishes as you assess students!
Debbie



Which edition do you have? If you didn't find it in the pages referenced in the original message you may have a different edition.
Debbie




Debbie,
If a student is actively processing a word- do we go ahead and tell the word within 3 seconds?
Or
Do we wait until the student stops processing- wait three seconds (silence) and then tell the student the word?
Thanks!
4 days ago
Topic:
BAS - when to tell the student an unknown word

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 531
Tam wrote:
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
RH wrote:
Could you please reference a page number in the instruction manual that addresses this?


The Coding and Scoring At-A-Glance page provides directions for giving a Told. It is found on the back inside cover and p. 22 in your Assessment Guide (BAS 1 3rd ed) Specific directions for each coding standard can be found in the Professional Development videos in the Online Resources.

Best wishes as you assess students!
Debbie



Which edition do you have? If you didn't find it in the pages referenced in the original message you may have a different edition.
Debbie
4 days ago
Topic:
Level O Fiction The New Girl

Tam
Tam
Posts: 5
So if a student is not familiar with the vocabulary/content (such as a bumper sticker)- are you saying that we can define it for them?
There are other higher level books- that have terms that students are not familiar with- can we define those as well?
Also- what does this mean for our ELL students?
4 days ago
Topic:
Level O Fiction The New Girl

Tam
Tam
Posts: 5
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
FPUser1646 wrote:
When our students read the Benchmark Assessment System level O fiction book, “The New Girl," they struggle to answer the question, “What does the narrator mean when she says Mom ‘was always coming up with sayings that sounded like…bumper stickers’?”

Our students are not familiar with a bumper sticker. How can we support students with the understanding of a bumper sticker without impacting the student results?

You are allowed to paraphrase a prompt. Please refer to page 31, Guidelines for Standardizing Administration of the Comprehension Conversation: “Although only paraphrasing of a prompt or question is allowed to help the student understand the question, avoid asking a question in a way that “gives” the answer.” In this case, you might say, ‘A bumper sticker is a label or sticker with a message, that is stuck on the bumper of a car.” You are trying to help the child understand the term without giving the answer.

I suggest you look at the rest of the explanation on page 31 as well as the remaining guidelines.
I hope this helps.
edited by Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant on 2/4/2019
5 days ago
Topic:
Summer Regression with LLI Students

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 531
hkissel wrote:
Thanks, Debbie! This will help me to frame a conversation with the school leaders.

Hilary


Thank YOU!! Keep having the conversations!
Debbie
6 days ago
Topic:
Summer Regression with LLI Students

hkissel
hkissel
Posts: 3
Thanks, Debbie! This will help me to frame a conversation with the school leaders.

Hilary




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