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23 hours ago
Topic:
Readers' Theatre

FPUser193172
FPUser193172
Posts: 1
" A Pizza for Horse" Level E has a script at the end.

Is there a place where I can find a list of which books have scripts at the end?
edited by FPUser193172 on 4/20/2021
5 days ago
Topic:
BOOKS IN RED KIT

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 935
sjr123 wrote:
I am very interested in purchasing additional books for the Red Kit. With only six copies of the title, it is very difficult to send the books home. If only one student does not bring it back, it is problematic. I have six students using the kit. Will they be available for purchase? If so, when?


The books from the Red System are available for purchase in packs of 6, page 24, in the catalog linked here: https://www.fountasandpinnell.com/shared/resources/FPL_OrderForm_2-5-21.pdf
The books are only sold in multiple copies of one title since they are designed for intervention use.

Best Wishes for success as you work with your students,
Helenann
5 days ago
Topic:
BOOKS IN RED KIT

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 935
tantonucci wrote:
It would be really helpful if these books were available to purchase in the black and white. The students get used to the routine of taking them home, and now I feel that I can't send these home. They're expensive to purchase in packs of 6 and my school just doesn't have the budget for that.


Thank you for your message. We totally agree with you. In fact, we tried to make them available in black and white, but to get the quality of the captions, detailed pictures and graphs, etc. of the intermediate books to the point of readability, the cost came to almost the same price as the colored books. We could not justify selling black and white books for the same price as the colored. Also, I have heard Fountas and Pinnell state that by grade 3, the students should be learning to take responsibility for borrowing and returning books. They suggested that teachers might try to develop a habit of borrowing and returning the books by first allowing the students to take the books into their classroom only and gradually over time allowing the books to go home. Many teachers report that their students love the books and are returning them in order to get another book. Your decision depends upon your students, your district and school policies, of course.

Best Wishes,
Helenann
5 days ago
Topic:
BOOKS IN RED KIT

tantonucci
tantonucci
Posts: 1
tantonucci
tantonucci
Posts: 1
Topic: BOOKS IN RED KIT
It would be really helpful if these books were available to purchase in the black and white. The students get used to the routine of taking them home, and now I feel that I can't send these home. They're expensive to purchase in packs of 6 and my school just doesn't have the budget for that.
5 days ago
Topic:
PWS - Etymological knowledge

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 935
Aidareyescruz wrote:
Hello,

I work with a school looking at implementing the PWS K-6 program and we were wondering whether etymological knowledge is covered and how, Thanks, Aida



Hi Aida, Etymological knowledge is covered in the Word Meaning/ Vocabulary lessons (WMV) one of nine areas of learning in PWS.. The WMV lessons focus on understanding related to vocabulary development including lessons such as words derived from different sources, words with a common origin, words with Latin and Greek roots, etc. We have samplers of PWS available for each grade level (K-6) at this link: https://thankyou.heinemann.com/fpc-sampler?utm_referrer=http%3A%2F%2Fheinemann.hs-sites.com

However, regarding your interest in a particular area of PWS, I suggest you contact your local sales representative who can provide more in depth information and provide a preview of materials.


You can find a rep by location here: https://www.heinemann.com/distributors.aspx


Best Wishes,
Helenann


6 days ago
Topic:
PWS - Etymological knowledge

Aidareyescruz
Aidareyescruz
Posts: 1
Hello,

I work with a school looking at implementing the PWS K-6 program and we were wondering whether etymological knowledge is covered and how, Thanks, Aida
20 days ago
Topic:
Science of Reading

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 802
Lizzyread wrote:
Hi, the link is not working.

I apologize. Some of the links may have been moved during maintenance. Use the tabs above to find the latest information. If the links in this message do not work you should be able to search to find the blog or documents you need.

Community/EXTEND/Research and Standards/ Phonics Efficacy Studies, Research Base and White Papers on Validity and Reliability (fountasandpinnell.com)

Debbie
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Tam wrote:
I am hoping at some point that Fountas and Pinnell will comment on the “science of reading” hijack. This SofR group has taken much that we have studied and are working hard at discounting it. I think myself and many other educators.would like some leadership support from Fountas and Pinnell to respond to questions/concerns.
I am a former RR teacher and RR training was the best training I have ever participated in. I continue to be a learner and I am following the SofR group and it astounds me how much of what they are calling for- is already done in RR, LLI and balanced literacy. Additionally, I am learning new information from the SofR group as well.
I have been in education for a very long time and I hate to see the pendulum swing...



Fountas and Pinnell have written many white papers, articles, and blogs related to their research and theory of teaching reading found under the EXTEND Your Expertise tab above in the Resource Library and Blog sections. Their professional books also describe teaching reading in great detail. Recently a podcast was transcribed that you can find at the following link. http://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/on-the-heinemann-podcast-a-word-on-phonics

Fountas and Pinnell's research and work is there to be read. Please continue to share your understandings based on the research from the beginning of their work together and that of Dr. Marie Clay.

Thank you for being an advocate for children and their learning.
Debbie
20 days ago
Topic:
Research based

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 802
Lizzyread wrote:
Hi I am wondering if you could provide any information of research studies with the use of Fountas and Pinnell Programs with ELL students including peer reviewed research studies. We are looking into your phonics program and we have 60% ELL population. I know the program is based on the research of Fountas and Pinnell, but are there actual studies of this population using the programs and effect sizes.



All of the REsearch can be found on this website under the Community/EXTEND/Research and Standards tabs. Efficacy Studies, Research Base and White Papers on Validity and Reliability (fountasandpinnell.com). I am not sure which resources you want to study but keep in mind that Fountas and Pinnell resources are not always a program that can follow a particular method of study since there are variables in implementation.

Best wishes!
Debbie
20 days ago
Topic:
Research based

Lizzyread
Lizzyread
Posts: 7
Lizzyread
Lizzyread
Posts: 7
Topic: Research based
Hi I am wondering if you could provide any information of research studies with the use of Fountas and Pinnell Programs with ELL students including peer reviewed research studies. We are looking into your phonics program and we have 60% ELL population. I know the program is based on the research of Fountas and Pinnell, but are there actual studies of this population using the programs and effect sizes.
21 days ago
Topic:
Science of Reading

Lizzyread
Lizzyread
Posts: 7
Lizzyread
Lizzyread
Posts: 7
Topic: Science of Reading
Hi, the link is not working.


Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
Tam wrote:
I am hoping at some point that Fountas and Pinnell will comment on the “science of reading” hijack. This SofR group has taken much that we have studied and are working hard at discounting it. I think myself and many other educators.would like some leadership support from Fountas and Pinnell to respond to questions/concerns.
I am a former RR teacher and RR training was the best training I have ever participated in. I continue to be a learner and I am following the SofR group and it astounds me how much of what they are calling for- is already done in RR, LLI and balanced literacy. Additionally, I am learning new information from the SofR group as well.
I have been in education for a very long time and I hate to see the pendulum swing...



Fountas and Pinnell have written many white papers, articles, and blogs related to their research and theory of teaching reading found under the EXTEND Your Expertise tab above in the Resource Library and Blog sections. Their professional books also describe teaching reading in great detail. Recently a podcast was transcribed that you can find at the following link. http://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/on-the-heinemann-podcast-a-word-on-phonics

Fountas and Pinnell's research and work is there to be read. Please continue to share your understandings based on the research from the beginning of their work together and that of Dr. Marie Clay.

Thank you for being an advocate for children and their learning.
Debbie
25 days ago
Topic:
Reading Records

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 802
DaynaB wrote:
I have a group of students who are Level K, Level M, Level N and Level P. I am currently doing level N guided reading books with the group. If I am to do a running record on my lower student (level K) do I do it with a Level N book that we have already covered or a book at her current level?

When grouping students you try to put those with similar reading abilities together. In GR group you introduce the same book to all students in the group. If you have K, M, N, P all in one group you must use level K books with the group so no student is ever put in a text that is too hard for efficient processing. Analyze carefully to see what the student reading level K needs in order to shift to being successful with level M texts and focus instruction there. Text selection will be very important for a group with such a wide range of behaviors. Read more about text selection and introducing texts in Guided Reading, 2nd ed Section 3, chapters 12-14.
Best wishes!
Debbie
25 days ago
Topic:
Reading Records

DaynaB
DaynaB
Posts: 2
DaynaB
DaynaB
Posts: 2
Topic: Reading Records
I have a group of students who are Level K, Level M, Level N and Level P. I am currently doing level N guided reading books with the group. If I am to do a running record on my lower student (level K) do I do it with a Level N book that we have already covered or a book at her current level?
3/15/2021
Topic:
Mini Lessons and Interactive Read Aloud Plan

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 802
mrsmcaleer3 wrote:
We have recently been given the Mini Lessons book and the Interactive Read-Aloud and we are trying to lay out a plan for next year. We have noticed that on some of the mini lessons it asks to refer back to 2 or 3 books, which are from different text sets. It does not seem practical to read aloud 2-3 books before one mini-lesson in one day. Is there a cohesive plan for the two programs to work together? We have the suggested pacing guides for both, but the books needed for the mini-lessons are in different text sets.




Follow-up: I checked with the team and I was correct. No chart was created. "We have intentionally not created a chart because the IRA books are suggestions for the teacher to use. The teacher might use other books that they have read in their classroom that address the principle rather than the books suggested."

Debbie
3/12/2021
Topic:
Phonics, Spelling and Word Study System

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 802
FPUser143771 wrote:
We are beginning to look into phonics programs to pilot next school year. We are currently using the BAS and LLI in the district and are looking into the Phonics, Spelling and Word Study System as another component to our Literacy curriculum. Is there a Scope and Sequence K-5 that I can direct my teachers to? This is one of the key pieces we are diving into as we consider programs.
Thank You!
edited by FPUser143771 on 3/12/2021

The PWS Systems include a Comprehensive PWS Guide that is a scope and sequence of principles taught across the grade levels. It aligns with the PWS Continuum section of the Literacy Continuum. The Fountas & Pinnell Comprehensive Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study Guide (fountasandpinnell.com) Your local sales rep can provide more information and details. Find a Heinemann Representative in Your State - Heinemann Publishing

Best wishes!
Debbie
3/12/2021
Topic:
Mini Lessons and Interactive Read Aloud Plan

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 802
FPUser177724 wrote:
Is there a way to determine which Mini-Lessons refer to each Interactive Read Aloud book? It would be helpful to know if a book will be referred to many times or only once or twice. Also, it would be a useful reference tool for planning purposes.
I do not know of such a chart. In the RML Guide chapter 8 section called A Suggested Sequence (p. 49 gr 1, p. 53 gr 33) the suggestion is made to use the Umbrella overview page to see a description of the mentor texts used for each umbrella. Figure 8.1 is a record-keeping form that you could use to make notes about the titles you might use for each RML. The FPC RML are packaged separately from the FPC IRA and responsive teaching encourages teachers to use texts that are engaging to each class rather than always following the suggestions year after year so I don't know that time was spent to create a chart like the one you are requesting. I will double check to make sure. You may find teachers in the FB Learning Community who have created such a chart. I see that this chapter in the RML Guide would have answered your previous question too. I apologize that I did not know that as I am still reading each of the Guides myself.
Kindly,
Debbie


Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
mrsmcaleer3 wrote:
We have recently been given the Mini Lessons book and the Interactive Read-Aloud and we are trying to lay out a plan for next year. We have noticed that on some of the mini lessons it asks to refer back to 2 or 3 books, which are from different text sets. It does not seem practical to read aloud 2-3 books before one mini-lesson in one day. Is there a cohesive plan for the two programs to work together? We have the suggested pacing guides for both, but the books needed for the mini-lessons are in different text sets.



Those are suggestions that if you have read those texts in other lessons to refer to them. You may use any texts that you have read for making the connection or whatever the suggestion is. When doing a minilesson you don't read the entire text of those read before but just a part that provides an example of the minilesson objective. You often will read parts of a few texts to provide a variety of examples for the minilesson. The professional development videos may provide helpful hints about using the lessons in more integrated ways. Check out the following links to help you get started.
http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/414
https://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/default?type=videos
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/faq-friday-is-there-a-suggested-sequence-of-reading-minilessons
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/what-are-reading-minilessons
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/hs-search-results?term=Minilessons
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/what-is-interactive-read-aloud

https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/the-importance-of-a-multi-text-approach-to-literacy-instruction

Best wishes for success!
Debbie

edited by FPUser177724 on 3/12/2021
3/12/2021
Topic:
Mini Lessons and Interactive Read Aloud Plan

FPUser177724
FPUser177724
Posts: 1
Is there a way to determine which Mini-Lessons refer to each Interactive Read Aloud book? It would be helpful to know if a book will be referred to many times or only once or twice. Also, it would be a useful reference tool for planning purposes.



Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
mrsmcaleer3 wrote:
We have recently been given the Mini Lessons book and the Interactive Read-Aloud and we are trying to lay out a plan for next year. We have noticed that on some of the mini lessons it asks to refer back to 2 or 3 books, which are from different text sets. It does not seem practical to read aloud 2-3 books before one mini-lesson in one day. Is there a cohesive plan for the two programs to work together? We have the suggested pacing guides for both, but the books needed for the mini-lessons are in different text sets.



Those are suggestions that if you have read those texts in other lessons to refer to them. You may use any texts that you have read for making the connection or whatever the suggestion is. When doing a minilesson you don't read the entire text of those read before but just a part that provides an example of the minilesson objective. You often will read parts of a few texts to provide a variety of examples for the minilesson. The professional development videos may provide helpful hints about using the lessons in more integrated ways. Check out the following links to help you get started.
http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/414
https://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/default?type=videos
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/faq-friday-is-there-a-suggested-sequence-of-reading-minilessons
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/what-are-reading-minilessons
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/hs-search-results?term=Minilessons
https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/what-is-interactive-read-aloud

https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/the-importance-of-a-multi-text-approach-to-literacy-instruction

Best wishes for success!
Debbie

edited by FPUser177724 on 3/12/2021
3/12/2021
Topic:
Phonics, Spelling and Word Study System

FPUser143771
FPUser143771
Posts: 2
We are beginning to look into phonics programs to pilot next school year. We are currently using the BAS and LLI in the district and are looking into the Phonics, Spelling and Word Study System as another component to our Literacy curriculum. Is there a Scope and Sequence K-5 that I can direct my teachers to? This is one of the key pieces we are diving into as we consider programs.
Thank You!
edited by FPUser143771 on 3/12/2021
3/10/2021
Topic:
Would you consider it an error?

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 802
Ana Maria Varela wrote:
A student says "It is" instead of saying "It´s" ( which is what is written on the book she is reading to her teacher). If the student knows her contractions well and just chooses to not contract the words, but say the two words, would this count as a substitution error? Or even as two errors?

Contractions are scored as one error either when the contraction is substituted for the 2 words or the 2 words are substituted for the contraction. Assessment uses the standards for coding and scoring whether a student knows the item in other settings or not.

Best wishes!
Debbie
3/10/2021
Topic:
Would you consider it an error?

Ana Maria Varela
Ana Maria Varela
Posts: 1
A student says "It is" instead of saying "It´s" ( which is what is written on the book she is reading to her teacher). If the student knows her contractions well and just chooses to not contract the words, but say the two words, would this count as a substitution error? Or even as two errors?
3/9/2021
Topic:
Guided Reading - Timeline

Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 802
DaynaB wrote:
I read that the during a guided reading session, teachers should be covering the whole book/lesson (I.e. Introduction, read the book, discuss/revisit and then word work). Many teachers at my school said they do not have enough time during a 20 minute rotation to cover all of it and are dragging the book out for several days. Most say the children take long to read the book independently (that is what is taking the most time). Could there be any other reasons for this? For the discussion and revisiting part, there is a TON of information on that page. I am starting to wonder if perhaps teachers are doing TOO much on that page? Just wondering what the rationale is and why it is important to cover one book during one session and to NOT drag it out all week.

Thank you.

GR lessons use the framework you have outlined. You can find more information about the lessons in the professional books Guided Reading, the Literacy Continuum, and many more. The following Blog also lists the steps. What is Guided Reading? (fountasandpinnell.com)
http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/181


If teachers are trying to teach a book they are not teaching GR. Well written GR books do contain many of the expected goals within a level, but are short enough to be used with a group for teaching the goals selected by the teacher for the students in the group, not everything a book has to teach. Teachers must be responsive to the group and what needs to be taught today for the students to shift towards more independence with texts of that complexity. However a teacher should NOT try to teach EVERY goal a book has to offer.

I have seen some upper elementary students finish reading longer texts independently before the discussion so teachers can rotate groups in tight schedules. The teacher introduces the text, gets everyone started, listens in a bit, then leaves that group to finish reading silently while she moves to introduce a text or have a discussion with another group. The teacher needs to assess the groups and make those decisions of how and when to gather evidence through observations to guide the selection of goals for the next lesson when schedules are limited. Students need to read MANY different books so a new book for each time the group meets is the norm for GR. Rarely a book might be used for more than one lesson. Often a book is referred to, connections are made, or sometimes revisiting might happen for a particular purpose. If the book is used over a period of days that is a basal lesson not GR.


Best wishes!
Debbie




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