search navigation

recent posts recent posts - RSS

1 hours ago
Topic:
BAS System 1 & 2 Level Overlap

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702
Heather K. wrote:
The BAS System 1 has levels A-N and the BAS System 2 has levels L-Z. Wondering why the overlap from L-N and how teachers/schools are going about using these. Do students from levels L-N have 4 different opportunities to read at each level (2 fiction; 2nonfiction)? Thank you!


Thank you for a great question. You will see differences in Level L, M and N in System 1 (designed for assessing up to grade 2 students) and System 2 (designed for assessing grade 3 and above). All of the books have evidence of text characteristics pertinent to the level as outlined in the Continuum. All support the use of proficient strategic action behaviors for each level as outlined in the Continuum.

The books in System 2 may appear harder because they were developed for and field tested with older students. Therefore the topics are more sophisticated and complex requiring possibly more background knowledge. The illustrations become less dominant and provide less support in texts for older students.

When administering the assessments using established consistent protocols based on a solid understanding of coding and scoring and an understanding of the rigor required in the comprehension conversation, you should see little difference beyond the shift in expectations for grade levels from one system to the next.

Some students have had less exposure to more sophisticated topics. Please see the Literacy Continuum for the types of texts and text features appropriate for each grade level. Some districts choose to conduct an occasional professional development calibration session to solidify consistent administration of the assessment. Another option is to review the tutorials online (in the Online Resources) as a support and refresher.
1 hours ago
Topic:
Level of Green System books

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702
PeBandre wrote:
We do not use LLI, but we have purchased many sets of the black and white take home books for our students to read during guided reading and during independent reading. The students love the stories! The challenge is that we cannot find the level of all of the books. We know that they are levels A-K, and we did find most of them on the leveled book website, but we are still unable to locate levels for 17 of the titles. Is there a list somewhere that can help us?


We are so glad to hear that your readers love the books! Here is the order form (which contains levels) for all the F&P literacy brand materials: http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/136
Please refer to Guided Reading Responsive Teaching Across the Grades for ways to use leveled texts.

I hope this helps.
13 hours ago
Topic:
BAS System 1 & 2 Level Overlap

Heather K.
Heather K.
Posts: 7
The BAS System 1 has levels A-N and the BAS System 2 has levels L-Z. Wondering why the overlap from L-N and how teachers/schools are going about using these. Do students from levels L-N have 4 different opportunities to read at each level (2 fiction; 2nonfiction)? Thank you!
1 days ago
Topic:
Level of Green System books

PeBandre
PeBandre
Posts: 1
We do not use LLI, but we have purchased many sets of the black and white take home books for our students to read during guided reading and during independent reading. The students love the stories! The challenge is that we cannot find the level of all of the books. We know that they are levels A-K, and we did find most of them on the leveled book website, but we are still unable to locate levels for 17 of the titles. Is there a list somewhere that can help us?
2 days ago
Topic:
Phonics and Word Study Resources

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702
AP wrote:
Thank you for getting back to me on this! Is there any resource available to help with the preparation work of the student materials for the "apply" part of each lesson? Please let me know. Thank you.


Great question! Here are a few resources to help....
You might use the video: Getting Started with Phonics, Spelling and Word Study located in the General Resources section of the Online Resources. There is also a Master Lesson Guide Suggested Sequence in this section as well.
Here is a link to Unpacking of the PWS System as well: http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/391
Here is a link to a couple webinars on PWS: http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/439 http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/178

I hope these suggestions prove helpful!
2 days ago
Topic:
Phonics and Word Study Resources

AP
AP
Posts: 2
Thank you for getting back to me on this! Is there any resource available to help with the preparation work of the student materials for the "apply" part of each lesson? Please let me know. Thank you.
3 days ago
Topic:
Alternating Fiction and Non-Fiction Texts

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702
Nicky1 wrote:
Hi There,

I would like some clarification on alternating the fiction and non-fiction texts when administering the BAS. Do you alternate the student's independent level? So if a student scored independently on a non-fiction text, and her instructional level was a fiction text, next time she is assessed would I start with a fiction text as I am basing this on what she read at her last independent level which was non-fiction?

Thank you for any support you can give.
edited by Nicky1 on 4/21/2019
edited by Nicky1 on 4/21/2019


Hi Nicky
Thanks for a great question! F&P state in the Benchmark Assessment Guide (3rd edition) page 17: “We recommend that you alternate the fiction and nonfiction texts as you move up the gradient during an assessment conference. So if you begin with a fiction title, use a nonfiction title at the next level tested. This will give you a picture of how the child is performing in both genres and provide a reliable instructional level. Children should not read both the fiction and nonfiction book at any particular level during the same assessment period. You will want to save the unused book for a later date, should you need to retest the child at that level.”

Therefore, in your example: if a student scored independent on a non-fiction text, instructional on a fiction text... the text I would begin with next would be a non-fiction text which is based on alternating genre from the last text read. Therefore, if I wanted to check to see if her last instructional level is now independent... I would have the non-fiction text available. However, if my analysis of daily lessons indicates that the student is far above that last level and I do not need to check that level for independence, I would still use the non-fiction text at the next level to check on student processing as that is the next alternating genre.

I hope this clarifies.
3 days ago
Topic:
Alternating Fiction and Non-Fiction Texts

Nicky1
Nicky1
Posts: 1
Hi There,

I would like some clarification on alternating the fiction and non-fiction texts when administering the BAS. Do you alternate the student's independent level? So if a student scored independently on a non-fiction text, and her instructional level was a fiction text, next time she is assessed would I start with a fiction text as I am basing this on what she read at her last independent level which was non-fiction?

Thank you for any support you can give.
edited by Nicky1 on 4/21/2019
edited by Nicky1 on 4/21/2019
6 days ago
Topic:
Phonics and Word Study Resources

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702
AP wrote:
Hi, we are planning to implement the Phonics component of the Fountas and Pinnell Classroom next year. I am looking to reduce prep time for the student resources and saw that there are "student set"s available. However, my Heinemann reps were unable to tell me how many copies come in each set. Could you please tell me exactly what is in these sets? I have included a picture so that you can see exactly what product I'm referring to. Thank you.

Hi! Thank you for a great question. The Ready Resources is a valuable time saver that provides teachers with preprinted, preassembled materials to use in lessons. These convenient materials are printed on long- lasting, heavy paper, perforated for easy punch-out use, and labeled by lesson number.

The Ready Resources set includes:
—Pre-printed pocket-chart cards (picture, word, and letter - all lesson specific)
—Alphabet Linking Chart
—Laminated blank word cards, blank pocket-chart cards, and blank sentence strips for use by both teacher and student.
—Uppercase and lowercase letter cards (small) 25 sets for students
—Uppercase and lowercase pocket-chart letter cards (large) 1 set for teacher
—Categorized pocket-chart sized picture cards, such as Beginning Consonant Letters, Ending Consonant Letters, rhyming words, etc.

In addition to the Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study System Ready Resources, teachers will have access to Online Resources, which includes lesson-specific materials for application activities, extending learning, and formal assessment. There is a convenient “You Will Need” section in each lesson that shows the specific materials needed for Teach, Apply, and Assess.

Here is a link to the sampler showing those resources: https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/197281/FPC%20Phonics%20Minisampler%20LP/FPC%20MiniSamp-PHONICS-9-14-WEB.pdf

We wish you success in implementing Phonics, Spelling and Word Study.
6 days ago
Topic:
Phonics and Word Study Resources

AP
AP
Posts: 2
Hi, we are planning to implement the Phonics component of the Fountas and Pinnell Classroom next year. I am looking to reduce prep time for the student resources and saw that there are "student set"s available. However, my Heinemann reps were unable to tell me how many copies come in each set. Could you please tell me exactly what is in these sets? I have included a picture so that you can see exactly what product I'm referring to. Thank you.
13 days ago
Topic:
End of Year BAS

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702
Linda Cox wrote:
If a child is reading above grade-level, what are the recommendations for EOY BAS? For example, a 2nd grade gifted student reading at a 5th grade level. Would you recommend guidelines for each grade-level as a district for EOY testing if students are reading above? Or, do we test all students to help determine progress?


“Often caps have been used to deal with inaccurate administration. Something to think about.” (Fountas and Pinnell). Please understand that what Irene is saying is that if the Literacy Continuum is used with understanding you will not need to set caps. It is important to find the hard text level to determine what is the highest instructional level a student can read successfully . If you are administering the assessment and scoring the comprehension conversation correctly- that means strong evidence as described in the rubric- we are confident that the student will not be able to show adequate comprehension more than about a year to a year and a half above grade level. We need to look at the behaviors on the continuum as the student cannot developmentally provide an adequate response.

Section 3 of the Assessment Guide includes a great resource under the headings: Recommended Placement Level and Looking Beyond the Numbers.

I hope this clarifies.
13 days ago
Topic:
F&P Applicability to foreign language learning

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702
Jared T wrote:
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:

A respected colleague and fellow consultant, Debbie Magoulick, has added this insight: if you are asking whether the responsive teaching would work in teaching any language, I think the thinking and processing to understand written text is the same in any language. The differences would be in the early literacy concepts that depend on directional movement since some written text goes in different directions or word boundaries since some languages write in characters that represent ideas rather than words alone, or symbol-sound correspondence that differs. But the searching, monitoring, solving, correcting, predicting, ... should still be the thinking or processing done in any language. Marie Clay studied processing around the world to develop her theory of reading as a complex process.”

Thank you for a great question, Jared.


Thanks for this perspective. I was specifically interested to know if there was any research into this because L2 learning is much different than L1 learning. One of the common things to do with any L2 education is to take to take L1 methods and apply them to L2 education. One of the big differences between L1 and L2 education is this: L1 learners already speak the language and the primary focus of the education is on literacy whereas with L2 learners they are both learning to speak AND read the language at the same time. This difference is even more apparent with literacy because the L1 learner is learning to read words they already know how to speak and are familiar with however the L2 learner may learn to read a word but still be unsure of it's meaning or how to use it.

In reality, L1 and L2 education is very different although it is quite tempting to view them as the same or very similar. The difference is even more pronounced with Chinese characters which are each unique morphemes with pronunciation that must be memorized and does not inherently have phonetic pronunciation embedded inside the character. Basically, Chinese characters can't be sounded out. You either know it or you don't, so traditional phonics type of systems used to figure out how to sound out a word don't work in Chinese. If it is accompanied by pinyin, which is a romanized phonetic pronunciation using the alphabet, that aids in the pronunciation but readers who lean too heavily on that will never truly learn to read characters and the Chinese language.

So sorry for that long winded description, but perhaps that gives a bit more context to my frame of reference and asking if there has been any research on the applicability of the F&P frame work towards learning a second language. It would seem to me that if someone did, then it would basically be applying a L1 learning method to L2 education. Yes, the language can be learned in that way, but there will likely be certain changes or adjustments that would make it better and more appropriate for L2 learners. However, I have a lot of respect for what F&P has done to further literacy education in the US and other countries. I just wanted to see if there was any research in this area for L2 education.

Thanks guys!
edited by Jared T on 4/10/2019


Thank you for your detailed explanation! I believe it does indeed add perspective to not only your question but the instruction required. Checking on the earlier research that I had sited, there is no distinction between the ELL population being L1 or L2. Therefore, as you suggested the results most likely include both populations considering the areas of the US that were involved in the study. Although the results are excellent, it does not provide the information you are specifically looking for. Teaching children to read is a challenge but adding in the language learning as well definitely increases the challenge. The final results ... children learning to read and loving to read are why we teach!

For teachers using any of the systems, as I stated earlier, there are always suggested ways of addressing needs of ELL students. In addition, in all materials, F&P strongly advise that teachers must adjust the lesson to accommodate the needs of all students.... not see a lesson as ‘one size fits all’. Just as you stated, there always need to be adjustments made to make it more appropriate for each individual learner.

Thank you for your patience in explaining your question and my attempt to respond. We are grateful that you find the F&P materials so valuable. It is an honor to serve teachers and students.
13 days ago
Topic:
End of Year BAS

Linda Cox
Linda Cox
Posts: 4
Linda Cox
Linda Cox
Posts: 4
Topic: End of Year BAS
If a child is reading above grade-level, what are the recommendations for EOY BAS? For example, a 2nd grade gifted student reading at a 5th grade level. Would you recommend guidelines for each grade-level as a district for EOY testing if students are reading above? Or, do we test all students to help determine progress?
14 days ago
Topic:
F&P Applicability to foreign language learning

Jared T
Jared T
Posts: 4
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:

A respected colleague and fellow consultant, Debbie Magoulick, has added this insight: if you are asking whether the responsive teaching would work in teaching any language, I think the thinking and processing to understand written text is the same in any language. The differences would be in the early literacy concepts that depend on directional movement since some written text goes in different directions or word boundaries since some languages write in characters that represent ideas rather than words alone, or symbol-sound correspondence that differs. But the searching, monitoring, solving, correcting, predicting, ... should still be the thinking or processing done in any language. Marie Clay studied processing around the world to develop her theory of reading as a complex process.”

Thank you for a great question, Jared.


Thanks for this perspective. I was specifically interested to know if there was any research into this because L2 learning is much different than L1 learning. One of the common things to do with any L2 education is to take to take L1 methods and apply them to L2 education. One of the big differences between L1 and L2 education is this: L1 learners already speak the language and the primary focus of the education is on literacy whereas with L2 learners they are both learning to speak AND read the language at the same time. This difference is even more apparent with literacy because the L1 learner is learning to read words they already know how to speak and are familiar with however the L2 learner may learn to read a word but still be unsure of it's meaning or how to use it.

In reality, L1 and L2 education is very different although it is quite tempting to view them as the same or very similar. The difference is even more pronounced with Chinese characters which are each unique morphemes with pronunciation that must be memorized and does not inherently have phonetic pronunciation embedded inside the character. Basically, Chinese characters can't be sounded out. You either know it or you don't, so traditional phonics type of systems used to figure out how to sound out a word don't work in Chinese. If it is accompanied by pinyin, which is a romanized phonetic pronunciation using the alphabet, that aids in the pronunciation but readers who lean too heavily on that will never truly learn to read characters and the Chinese language.

So sorry for that long winded description, but perhaps that gives a bit more context to my frame of reference and asking if there has been any research on the applicability of the F&P frame work towards learning a second language. It would seem to me that if someone did, then it would basically be applying a L1 learning method to L2 education. Yes, the language can be learned in that way, but there will likely be certain changes or adjustments that would make it better and more appropriate for L2 learners. However, I have a lot of respect for what F&P has done to further literacy education in the US and other countries. I just wanted to see if there was any research in this area for L2 education.

Thanks guys!
edited by Jared T on 4/10/2019
15 days ago
Topic:
Assessment

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702
SusanEllenBrown wrote:
If we benchmark a student at the end of the school year in LLI, do we have to give the benchmark-again- at the beginning of the the next school year?


This is a great question! I love that you are thinking ahead! Please refer to the Benchmark Assessment Guide, 3rd edition, page 3: “We suggest administering this assessment at least once at the beginning of the school year to know where to begin instruction, and then again in March or April. By scheduling in this way, you can assess a student’s progress across most of the school year and also use the March/April results to inform teaching through the end of the year. Time and frequency of administration will vary according to school district needs.”

The advantage of assessing your students at the beginning of the school year is to determine where they are ‘now’ and what strategies they are using to process text. Some students may have advanced and some may need a bit of support to get back on track. One of the best features of the BAS is the observation of strategies recorded while the student is actively engaged in reading the text as well as the conversation the occurs afterward. Once the level is determined, analysis should follow. Refer to Recommended Placement Level and Looking Beyond the Numbers in Section 3 of the Benchmark Assessment Guide to support your analysis and The Literacy Continuum list of behaviors to Notice Teach and Support at that level to help set goals.

This gathering of information, along with the level, are key for the new teacher in determining what and how we need to teach!
With this information you will be building on a strong foundation getting off to a strong start, with few surprises, at the beginning of the year!

We wish you success!
15 days ago
Topic:
The Street Fair-Level B F & P guided reading set

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702
FPUser18551 wrote:
The Level B title Street Fair from the F & P Guided Reading Classroom is labelled as nonfiction. I am wondering if someone can explain in detail why?
The pictures look fictional and there is a simple story about two sisters attending a fair. There are no non-fiction text features. We usually help students distinguish between fiction and non-fiction by locating text features such as labels, diagrams, real photographs, glossary, factual content etc.
How can we explain this as a non-fiction text to the students?


According to their structures, nonfiction texts can be organized into the categories of narrative and non-narrative. Non-fiction genre includes prose or poetry that provides factual information. This text is a narrative non-fiction text that tells a story using a narrative structure and literary language to make a topic interesting and appealing to readers at this level. The text features indicate that it is a simple factual text that gives a firsthand account of the event or topic and provides a clear simple easily identified theme or idea: having fun. Memoirs are a good example of a narrative non-fiction text which may or may not contain photos. Teaching narrative non-fiction text features can be supported by comparing other books you have read that are non-fiction narrative that have either photos, graphics or drawings to support the factual information presented.

For further information on teaching genre to all ages, I suggest the professional book: Genre Study. Genre Study focuses on inquiry-based learning with an emphasis on reading comprehension and the craft of writing. Through age-appropriate mentor texts, students discover, define, and analyze the foundational characteristics of fiction and nonfiction genres. That professional resource is linked here: https://www.fountasandpinnell.com/genrestudy/

I am so glad that you are talking about how to distinguish genre at these levels! It is through genre understandings that your students think, talk, and read texts with deeper understanding, and write effectively.
15 days ago
Topic:
Patterned books

Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702
Krystal1897 wrote:
My academic coach said that we are not allowed to give the words during an assessment of a pattern book(ex level A-C).
For example: “The cat can jump. The cat can play. The cat can run.” The student is missing the word “can” over and over. If you mark it as a error are you allowed to tell the student the word?


Thank you for your question. The goal of the Benchmark Assessment is to observe what the reader can do on their own without support. This not only tells you the level of instruction but gives you explicit information about what strategic action behaviors need support and what behaviors are being used with efficiency. The protocol for giving a ‘told’ while taking a reading record is: the reader must first appeal before a word is provided. In other words they have to notice a mismatch! (Benchmark Assessment Guide 3rd Edition, page 22: Coding Errors and Self Corrections in Oral Reading)

There are verbal appeals, when the reader requests help or non verbal appeals such as the reader stopping at an unknown word. You are allowed in both cases to say, “Try it” to see if a gentle nudge will give you an idea if there is a part of the word the child’s eyes are focusing on or what strategies the child is attempting to use on his/her own. For example, their attempt might reveal that they are looking only at the beginning or ending or even middle of the word. This would indicate the next steps for your instruction (after the assessment is completed).

Missing the word “can” over and over will cause the text to be a hard level for this reader. But you will know where to go next to fill in the gaps in the reading process. The child needs to learn how to self monitor and then self correct. Please take a look at Looking Beyond the Numbers in Section 3 of the Benchmark Assessment Guide to support your analysis of the strategies used during the child’s reading of text. Next, the best resource to determine what to teach is The Literacy Continuum, which is included in the Benchmark Assessment System. It is something every teacher needs to always have at hand to support their teaching and is linked here: https://www.heinemann.com/products/e06078.aspx

We wish you success,
15 days ago
Topic:
Assessment

SusanEllenBrown
SusanEllenBrown
Posts: 1
SusanEllenBrown
SusanEllenBrown
Posts: 1
Topic: Assessment
If we benchmark a student at the end of the school year in LLI, do we have to give the benchmark-again- at the beginning of the the next school year?
16 days ago
Topic:
The Street Fair-Level B F & P guided reading set

FPUser18551
FPUser18551
Posts: 2
The Level B title Street Fair from the F & P Guided Reading Classroom is labelled as nonfiction. I am wondering if someone can explain in detail why?
The pictures look fictional and there is a simple story about two sisters attending a fair. There are no non-fiction text features. We usually help students distinguish between fiction and non-fiction by locating text features such as labels, diagrams, real photographs, glossary, factual content etc.
How can we explain this as a non-fiction text to the students?
16 days ago
Topic:
Patterned books

Krystal1897
Krystal1897
Posts: 1
Krystal1897
Krystal1897
Posts: 1
Topic: Patterned books
My academic coach said that we are not allowed to give the words during an assessment of a pattern book(ex level A-C).
For example: “The cat can jump. The cat can play. The cat can run.” The student is missing the word “can” over and over. If you mark it as a error are you allowed to tell the student the word?




Powered by Jitbit Forum 8.3.8.0 © 2006-2013 Jitbit Software