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Lisa F.
Lisa F.
Posts: 9


2/15/2018
Lisa F.
Lisa F.
Posts: 9
When students read book during guided reading, is it ever advised to reread the same book during a subsequent guided reading lesson?

Is it okay to use a book, such as Frog and Toad during guided reading, with a "chapter" being a "lesson" for guided reading?

Is it okay to use a book with no pictures (chapter book, whether short or long) for older students, again with a "chapter" being a "lesson" for guided reading?

Any advice is much appreciated.
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 887


2/15/2018
Lisa F. wrote:
When students read book during guided reading, is it ever advised to reread the same book during a subsequent guided reading lesson?

Is it okay to use a book, such as Frog and Toad during guided reading, with a "chapter" being a "lesson" for guided reading?

Is it okay to use a book with no pictures (chapter book, whether short or long) for older students, again with a "chapter" being a "lesson" for guided reading?
Any advice is much appreciated.


Fountas and Pinnell suggest that, in most cases, the best option is to read a short book during a guided reading lesson, so readers have ‘a picture’ of the whole text. However, if a chapter book is selected (which includes books with or without pictures), one chapter may be read per lesson. Special forms of texts, like short stories, graphic texts, photo essays and news articles can also be included in guided reading lessons

Typically we would not reread the same book during guided reading lessons, but at lower levels (because the books are short) you may have a brief time in the lesson to reread books for practicing fluency. As texts become more complex, the introduction becomes longer as you build background knowledge before reading the text and reading the text takes longer as well. The trick is to choose the ‘just right book’ for your group. Fountas and Pinnell state, in Guided Reading Responsive Teaching Across the Grades, page 12: “The teacher selects a text that is appropriate for the group in that it offers a small, but significant, amount of challenge. Students read the same book so that they share the experience, and the teaching is meaningful for all members of the group.
 The teacher introduces the text in a way that provides just enough support to allow students to process this more challenging text with accuracy, fluency, and understanding.

When the ‘just right’ text is chosen, there should be no need to reread the text, unless you are taking a reading record of one student. In that case, F&P suggest taking the reading record of yesterday’s new book, just before you start the guided reading lesson!

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Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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