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Shared Reading Messages in this topic - RSS

Kmcj
Kmcj
Posts: 5


4/24/2018
Kmcj
Kmcj
Posts: 5
Hello,

Why are the Shared Reading Books not leveled? I see that they are above grade level, but what is the purpose of the 6 copies of books for after the big book read?

Thanks!
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 887


4/24/2018
Kmcj wrote:
Hello,

Why are the Shared Reading Books not leveled? I see that they are above grade level, but what is the purpose of the 6 copies of books for after the big book read?

The Big Books below are in a recommended sequence based on book series, genre, and/or connecting topics; however, you may introduce them in any order that meets the needs of the children in your classroom. Through shared reading, children have the opportunity to engage in the reading process with texts that most of the children would not be able to read independently but are appropriate for their grade level in terms of text features and content. As children enjoy subsequent readings of the text together, guide them in text-based discussions and make teaching points that help children develop a wide range of important understandings and abilities: concepts about print, phonological awareness, letter knowledge, letter/sound relationships, word-analysis skills, vocabulary, genre types, aspects of fluent reading, noticing the writer’s or illustrator’s craft, and more. Perhaps most important of all, shared reading reinforces and embodies an essential message of the classroom: we can do this together.
Six small copies of each Big Book are provided for children to revisit during independent reading.

We wish you success as you use the Shared Reading Books with your students.



Thanks!


--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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Linda Cox
Linda Cox
Posts: 8


9/5/2018
Linda Cox
Linda Cox
Posts: 8
How much time should be spent on text introduction, first reading and second reading? Is it recommended that these three components be completed all on the same day every time shared reading is planned?
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 747


9/5/2018
Linda Cox wrote:
How much time should be spent on text introduction, first reading and second reading? Is it recommended that these three components be completed all on the same day every time shared reading is planned?



The pacing of lessons depends on the purpose or goals of instruction. Teachers should decide what the focus of the lesson is and plan from there. The text introduction in shared reading is very short because you are going to share the text. The first reading is more like a read-aloud with just a couple of stopping points if needed. The second reading is where the focus of the lesson is so more time is spent there. Sometimes the shared reading text is a revisiting of an IRA text so occurs on a different day, it could also be a SR text on a different day. The second reading doesn't have to be a complete rereading of the entire text; again depending on the purpose of the lesson.

Are you using the FPC lessons? The lessons have suggestions of how the text can be used. You do not have to do every single bullet suggested in one lesson or at all. You select the goals for your lessons based on the assessed need for the instruction.

More information can be found in the FPC Shared Reading System Guide or Guided Reading. There are some helpful blogs, webinars, and videos in the other tables found at this website. (Engage for blogs and tips; Extend for webinars and videos; Online Resources for the FPC webinars and videos)

Responsive teaching means the teacher is making decisions for instruction in her/his classroom for the students in front of him/her each day. Teaching is not an exact science when unique individual brains are involved. Thank you for seeking to improve your craft!

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
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