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Letter and Sound Recognition Messages in this topic - RSS

DebbieMF
DebbieMF
Posts: 5


10/21/2018
DebbieMF
DebbieMF
Posts: 5
My district recently adopted F and P Phonics and Words Study for our kindergarten program. We can not find where in the program it teaches the students the letter names and letter sounds. I am wondering if the program assumes that kindergarten students already know their letters and sounds. We were using a program called Fundations that taught the letters in a certain order and the letter sounds along with the letter name.
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 888


10/21/2018
DebbieMF wrote:
My district recently adopted F and P Phonics and Words Study for our kindergarten program. We can not find where in the program it teaches the students the letter names and letter sounds. I am wondering if the program assumes that kindergarten students already know their letters and sounds. We were using a program called Fundations that taught the letters in a certain order and the letter sounds along with the letter name.


You might refer to the MASTER LESSON GUIDE Suggested Sequence for Phonics Lessons in the Online Resources for one possible lesson order. If you choose to follow the sequence given, you will begin with hearing and matching sounds in words followed by and introduction to letter knowledge in lesson #8. The F&P System includes both explicit teaching along with inquiry. Fountas & Pinnell Classroom includes one or more four-page lessons for each kindergarten concept within the nine areas of learning. The phonics lessons are designed so that, as you use them, you will always consider the particular children you teach. You will decide which lessons to use and whether or not to modify them to meet the needs of your particular students.
Certainly, you will note the connections you can make to your own children’s discoveries and learning about sounds, letters, and words across the instructional contexts of Fountas & Pinnell Classroom.

We hope you and your students enjoy the Phonics, Spelling and Word Study System,

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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DebbieMF
DebbieMF
Posts: 5


10/21/2018
DebbieMF
DebbieMF
Posts: 5
We are following the lesson pacing guide as recommend in the manual. What what are not seeing is the explicit teaching of the letters and their sounds. We have put the lessons together through December. We have seem lots of lessons that focus on sound sorting, rhyming, syllables. I am thinking that the program does not teach the letter sounds as we have always followed a prescribed method, order to teach the letters. This program I am thinking it expecting the students to learn the letters through the varied experiences of each lesson and picture sorts?
0 link
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 888


10/21/2018
DebbieMF wrote:
We are following the lesson pacing guide as recommend in the manual. What what are not seeing is the explicit teaching of the letters and their sounds. We have put the lessons together through December. We have seem lots of lessons that focus on sound sorting, rhyming, syllables. I am thinking that the program does not teach the letter sounds as we have always followed a prescribed method, order to teach the letters. This program I am thinking it expecting the students to learn the letters through the varied experiences of each lesson and picture sorts?


When considering effective phonics instruction, two issues often arise:
 Should instruction be explicit or implicit, that is, embedded in the processes of reading and writing?
 Should we teach children directly or allow them to discover or generalize essential concepts for themselves?
A cohesive literacy system, such as Fountas & Pinnell Classroom, answers these questions in the affirmative, with a “both/and” (instead of an “either/or”) approach. One goal of our teaching is to help children become active examiners and analyzers of print. We want them always to be searching for connections and patterns, to form categories of knowledge, and to have a store of examples to which they can refer. (Basically you begin by helping children learn how to listen and how to look. This may be a different approach from what you have used before.)

In addition, I am quoting F&P Consultant Teri Beeler from the Facebook page: “F&P do not recommend one specific sequence (of introducing letters) as their work is always based more on strategies than isolated skills. For example, they would recommend that you first begin by building on children's names making a class name chart and doing alphabet linking with it, name puzzles, lots of attention to letters in shared and interactive writing and shared reading etc. All children have varying degrees of exposure to print upon entering preK and K but everyone has a name so we will begin by building on the familiar and not limiting that process to one letter at a time.

With that said, you will find references in Phonics, Spelling and Word Study Guide regarding possible groupings of letters such as ( b, m, r, s), (t,g,n,p), (c,h,f,d) (l,k,j,w) and (y, z, v, q, x) for teaching letter names. These letters are grouped so that they are clearly differentiated from each other. They see this as a strategic process of recognizing distinctive features of letter forms, (some have straight lines, some have curved etc), then learning their names, differentiating between upper and lower case, etc. with learning a number of letters at the same time in various ways. (and don't forget knowing the sound a letter makes is very different than hearing the sound a letter makes which is critical)”

You are right... this is a different approach. It includes both explicit and implicit instruction. As you plan ask: What do your children already know, and what do they need to learn next? As you consider your children, your insights will guide your choice of lessons and help you tailor instruction to your children’s specific learning needs.

We wish you success as you use the PWS system,

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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