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Level O Fiction The New Girl Messages in this topic - RSS

FPUser1646
FPUser1646
Posts: 1


2/4/2019
FPUser1646
FPUser1646
Posts: 1
When our students read the Benchmark Assessment System level O fiction book, “The New Girl," they struggle to answer the question, “What does the narrator mean when she says Mom ‘was always coming up with sayings that sounded like…bumper stickers’?”

Our students are not familiar with a bumper sticker. How can we support students with the understanding of a bumper sticker without impacting the student results?



Thank you.
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702


2/4/2019
FPUser1646 wrote:
When our students read the Benchmark Assessment System level O fiction book, “The New Girl," they struggle to answer the question, “What does the narrator mean when she says Mom ‘was always coming up with sayings that sounded like…bumper stickers’?”

Our students are not familiar with a bumper sticker. How can we support students with the understanding of a bumper sticker without impacting the student results?

You are allowed to paraphrase a prompt. Please refer to page 31, Guidelines for Standardizing Administration of the Comprehension Conversation: “Although only paraphrasing of a prompt or question is allowed to help the student understand the question, avoid asking a question in a way that “gives” the answer.” In this case, you might say, ‘A bumper sticker is a label or sticker with a message, that is stuck on the bumper of a car.” You are trying to help the child understand the term without giving the answer.

I suggest you look at the rest of the explanation on page 31 as well as the remaining guidelines.
I hope this helps.
edited by Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant on 2/4/2019

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Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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Tam
Tam
Posts: 5


3/20/2019
Tam
Tam
Posts: 5
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant wrote:
FPUser1646 wrote:
When our students read the Benchmark Assessment System level O fiction book, “The New Girl," they struggle to answer the question, “What does the narrator mean when she says Mom ‘was always coming up with sayings that sounded like…bumper stickers’?”

Our students are not familiar with a bumper sticker. How can we support students with the understanding of a bumper sticker without impacting the student results?

You are allowed to paraphrase a prompt. Please refer to page 31, Guidelines for Standardizing Administration of the Comprehension Conversation: “Although only paraphrasing of a prompt or question is allowed to help the student understand the question, avoid asking a question in a way that “gives” the answer.” In this case, you might say, ‘A bumper sticker is a label or sticker with a message, that is stuck on the bumper of a car.” You are trying to help the child understand the term without giving the answer.

I suggest you look at the rest of the explanation on page 31 as well as the remaining guidelines.
I hope this helps.
edited by Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant on 2/4/2019
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Tam
Tam
Posts: 5


3/20/2019
Tam
Tam
Posts: 5
So if a student is not familiar with the vocabulary/content (such as a bumper sticker)- are you saying that we can define it for them?
There are other higher level books- that have terms that students are not familiar with- can we define those as well?
Also- what does this mean for our ELL students?
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 540


3/20/2019
Tam wrote:
So if a student is not familiar with the vocabulary/content (such as a bumper sticker)- are you saying that we can define it for them?
There are other higher level books- that have terms that students are not familiar with- can we define those as well?
Also- what does this mean for our ELL students?



Check the new Guidelines for the Comprehension Conversation. What are you trying to learn about this student? It is not just about the words in the story but how does the student attempt to solve unfamiliar content including words.

To me, "bumper sticker" is one of those terms that a student should infer the meaning from the words (morphological units) In Level O under Thinking Within the Text/Solving Words/Vocabulary students should be able to connect and expand words by connecting to other words. I would think a child has heard someone talk about the bumper of a car and knows what stickers are so could think about what a bumper sticker is from that. If not it gives you information about what the student needs to learn; in this case the label words for parts of a car or how to solve less familiar terms by using what they do know. Also note the goals in the Continuum for Inferring meaning and important information.

Always keep in mind you are trying to gather information that will guide your instructional decisions for thinking, not just for teaching words and phrases.

Best wishes as you observe and assess your students!
Debbie
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