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How many self-corrections is too many? Messages in this topic - RSS

juliaosei
juliaosei
Posts: 1


2/26/2019
juliaosei
juliaosei
Posts: 1
Hi!

In a recent PD on progress monitoring in between benchmark assessments in order to move students up instructional reading levels, my colleagues and I (K-2) noted that according to Fountas and Pinnell, when a student’s self-correction ratio is too high, it can interfere with a child’s ability to make and monitor for meaning when reading. Of course, the teacher also needs to take into consideration the student’s accuracy, fluency, and comprehension of the text when making instructional decisions. However, if all things were equal - say roughly 95% accuracy with sufficient fluency and comprehension - what might the cutoff be for the self-correction ratio?

Thank you in advance for the information!
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702


2/27/2019
juliaosei wrote:
Hi!

In a recent PD on progress monitoring in between benchmark assessments in order to move students up instructional reading levels, my colleagues and I (K-2) noted that according to Fountas and Pinnell, when a student’s self-correction ratio is too high, it can interfere with a child’s ability to make and monitor for meaning when reading. Of course, the teacher also needs to take into consideration the student’s accuracy, fluency, and comprehension of the text when making instructional decisions. However, if all things were equal - say roughly 95% accuracy with sufficient fluency and comprehension - what might the cutoff be for the self-correction ratio?

Thank you in advance for the information!


No cut off for the self-correction ratio is given. The ratio does guide our decisions about needed instruction.

From Guided Reading Responsive Teaching Across the Grades, Fountas and Pinnell state, “In Clay’s (1968) readers, overt self-correction virtually disappeared within about a year, and that is our experience as well. You would not want to see a great many self-corrections in experienced, expert reading. Much overt processing would mean that the reader is working too hard to give attention to the more complex ideas in the text. The text would be broken up. Even a high accuracy rate is undesirable if the reader has to work too hard on processing. Sometimes more experienced readers have even learned to “over correct.” When reading aloud, highly proficient readers tend to overtly self-correct only when there is a purpose to it—for example, if the error would cause listeners to misperceive. You can notice that behavior in television newscasters, who are reading aloud. When reading silently, the reader probably does self-correct but it is part of one smooth set of actions.”

F&P caution us against letting the numbers only determine our decisions. The numbers might look good, while not telling the correct story about the child’s processing. Instead, the instructional level, determined by the assessment scores, should be considered the starting point. Section 3 of the Benchmark Assessment Guide: Recommended Placement Level and Looking Beyond the Numbers provide helpful guidance in analyzing the records. After analysis of the behaviors used on the reading record, the Literacy Continuum should be the ‘go to’ resource... i.e. determining appropriate level placement and strategies that need to be taught.

How much self correcting is too much will need to be a determination made by the teacher administering the assessment. Analyzing the reading record while looking beyond the numbers is our best tool for determining next steps.

I hope this has helped.

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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