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Questions About Summary, Main Message, and Theme Messages in this topic - RSS

hkissel
hkissel
Posts: 4


26 days ago
hkissel
hkissel
Posts: 4
Hello,

Some fifth grade teachers in one of my buildings have questions about the differences between, and expectations for, summaries with main ideas and details, themes and also the differences between main message and theme on the F and P BAS. I've posted their questions below:

What is the difference between a message, a theme, and a main idea?

Are message and theme the same?

Should message or theme be included in the summary?


Thanks for your input.
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Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Helenann Steensen, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 702


22 days ago
hkissel wrote:
Hello,

Some fifth grade teachers in one of my buildings have questions about the differences between, and expectations for, summaries with main ideas and details, themes and also the differences between main message and theme on the F and P BAS. I've posted their questions below:

What is the difference between a message, a theme, and a main idea?

Are message and theme the same?

Should message or theme be included in the summary?


Thanks for your input.


Fountas and Pinnell state in Genre Study, “The theme (also called the big idea) of a story is the underlying message or messages in the text or the bigger meaning below the story’s surface. The theme reveals the author’s purpose. The big idea is often stated at the end of a story and is sometimes voiced by one of the characters.... Most of the time, themes are not explicitly stated and must be uncovered by the reader....As with many high-quality stories, several themes can be derived from [a story]....We need to help our students become sophisticated enough to identify the main theme of a story or to discern and discuss multiple themes.”

Please refer to the Rubric for Scoring the Comprehension Conversation: Thinking Within the Text for the expectations of a good summary in the Benchmark Assessment Guide. From Guided Reading Responsive Teaching Across the Grades: “Readers summarize as they read. They remember important information and use it later in a text as information for problem solving and understanding. That means they do not remember every word or detail but distinguish and retain the impor­tant ideas and information from the trivial.”

We wish you success,

--
Helenann Steensen, Official Fountas & Pinnell Consultant, Heinemann
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