search navigation

HomeShare Your Story

Share your story. Share your success. Be inspired by the literacy lives impacted by Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™.

Sight Words Messages in this topic - RSS

FPUser59760
FPUser59760
Posts: 4


5/7/2019
FPUser59760
FPUser59760
Posts: 4
Hello,
We have a grade 1 student who cannot read sight words in isolation, yet can and is able to read the same words correctly when in a book/in context. Is it important to be able to read these words in isolation? How can I help this student?
0 link
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 673


5/8/2019
FPUser59760 wrote:
Hello,
We have a grade 1 student who cannot read sight words in isolation, yet can and is able to read the same words correctly when in a book/in context. Is it important to be able to read these words in isolation? How can I help this student?



This is a tricky question that really requires a closer observation before I could provide specific suggestions. It depends on the level of the reader. At this time of the first grade year it matters quite a bit. A student should know how to attend to print and how to learn words by the end of Kindergarten, usually readers reading level C-D. Levels A-B lessons should provide the instruction for those strategic flexible ways of attending to print and learning how letters work in words (early literacy concepts).

If this student has already been identified as one needing an intervention then lessons in levels A-D should be helping to strengthen those ways of thinking (Leveled Literacy Intervention lessons do). Fountas and Pinnell have suggestions for helping readers who struggle with learning how words work in their professional books: When Readers Struggle, Phonics Lessons, and Guided Reading.

The focus in lessons is not on memorizing a list of sight words or learning to match letters and sounds, but on how to flexibly search for and use known letters, sounds, and whole words embedded in text and to be able to write words quickly, fluently, and flexibly as needed when writing text. A student who does not read a list of words successfully but reads those words within context may be relying too much on story meaning and language structures and not using known visual information. This student will probably never be a successful reader on grade level.

To help a student learn to search for and use information, teach them to use linking charts, analogous relationships, break words a part in flexible ways, put parts back together to make words. These procedures are described in detail in the resources mentioned above. If you do not have a Literacy Continuum to guide your thinking about which strategic actions are needed, which level of complexity is needed across levels of text you may want to read the document at the following link to get a sense of the expectations at each level and make a decision about where the gaps may be. http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/resourcelibrary/id/140

Best wishes for success!
Debbie
0 link





Powered by Jitbit Forum 8.3.8.0 © 2006-2013 Jitbit Software