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Fountas and Pinnell professional books including the Comprehensive Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study Guide, and Literacy Beginnings.

Alphabet Linking Chart and F&P Phonics Lessons Messages in this topic - RSS

BethMooreSchool
BethMooreSchool
Posts: 3


7 days ago
BethMooreSchool
BethMooreSchool
Posts: 3
Hi! Our district just purchased F&P Phonics & Word Study Lessons for every classroom, K-4 and we are very excited about it. In kindergarten, we are wondering if there is a place in the materials to find directions for a daily alphabet routine. There is a lesson that explicitly uses the alphabet linking chart (LK6, quite a few weeks into the school year), but we imagine that reading the alphabet chart ("A, apple, /a/") would be a routine that we would do daily with kids, and that there would be alphabet charts easily accessible to kids throughout the day. We can't find anything in the guide books that mention this routine. (Same for the word wall - we found a few pictures and some lessons that use the word wall, but no daily routines).
Please advise!
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 673


7 days ago
BethMooreSchool wrote:
Hi! Our district just purchased F&P Phonics & Word Study Lessons for every classroom, K-4 and we are very excited about it. In kindergarten, we are wondering if there is a place in the materials to find directions for a daily alphabet routine. There is a lesson that explicitly uses the alphabet linking chart (LK6, quite a few weeks into the school year), but we imagine that reading the alphabet chart ("A, apple, /a/") would be a routine that we would do daily with kids, and that there would be alphabet charts easily accessible to kids throughout the day. We can't find anything in the guide books that mention this routine. (Same for the word wall - we found a few pictures and some lessons that use the word wall, but no daily routines).
Please advise!



The Alphabet Linking Chart and Word Wall are resource tools for children to use as well as the Name Chart. They are reference charts. You may use the lesson (LK6) to teach them how to link the knowledge they have learned in the previous lessons and in SR, SWr lessons. You should have enough copies of the charts for each child to use at their seat, in writing workshop at a literacy center, or in guided reading lessons. You can print more from your Online Resources. These 3 charts are visual tools to use for linking as the children are learning about letters, and learning to link letters with sounds in solving to read and write words. The word wall is to hold their repertoire of words until they become internalized.

It is left to the teacher to decide when to use the tools and how. LK6 teaches children to read the chart in many ways so it is not the same every day. Learning about letters is not just rote memorization and repetition of the poster and the same for reading words on the word wall. Note on p. 22-23 of the PWS Guide it is suggested that you refer to the word wall during lessons throughout the literacy lessons. The Name chart should be used in a similar way. All 3 should be referred to in any lesson for which it is appropriate. Typically you start with the Name chart then by the time you get to LK6 the students have some concepts under control with which to connect the ABC chart and have begun to build the Word Wall.

Please note that the sound of the letters don't have to be read in isolation as you mention (A, apple, /a/) every time you read the chart. It is a more practical and less confusing to read Aa (names of the letters) and (apple) the sound is at the beginning of the word being read. Isolating the phonemes is one task for PA lessons but not the only way to read the ABC chart. The purpose is to teach children to make connections between words and use what is known in one word to solve another when reading and writing. Isolating phonemes can be difficult for some children who are still developing the auditory system and may not be able to distinguish abstract sounds easily, it is hard for some teachers (/b/ instead of /buh/). It is easier and more authentic to say the sound with the word. So mix it up and refer to the charts often, every time students need help in solving a word in reading and/or writing. Reading the alphabet usually doesn't need to be a daily routine with all children. Use the routine in small groups with those who need it more.

Best wishes!
Debbie
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