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Definition of 'decoding' Messages in this topic - RSS

litchick7
litchick7
Posts: 2


10 days ago
litchick7
litchick7
Posts: 2
Can anyone point me to a resource/website/article that actually defines 'decoding?'
I am struggling to locate a specific definition for it and the articles I have found seem to say different things.
My follow up question is: What makes a word decodable as opposed to non-decodable?
'Said' is a high frequency word. Is it 'decodable?'
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Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Debbie Magoulick, Fountas & Pinnell Consultant
Posts: 740


9 days ago
litchick7 wrote:
Can anyone point me to a resource/website/article that actually defines 'decoding?'
I am struggling to locate a specific definition for it and the articles I have found seem to say different things.
My follow up question is: What makes a word decodable as opposed to non-decodable?
'Said' is a high frequency word. Is it 'decodable?'




In their Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study Lesson Guides Fountas and Pinnell define decoding as "Using letter-sound relationships to translate a word from a series of symbols to a unit of meaning." Thus a decodable word would be one that could be translated using the letter-sound relationships.


The problem in our language is that many of our letters have more than one sound, especially vowels, that might depend on the letters around it (spelling patterns or phonograms), many do not follow the 45 phonics generalizations/rules typically taught or the 44 phonemes may vary with dialect or cultural speech patterns. 'Said' is one that is not considered decodable because the 'ai' does not follow the typical phonogram for 'ai' nor does it follow the spelling pattern for '-aid.'


Fountas and Pinnell's Phonics/Word Study systems include 9 areas of learning to help students learn a range of word-solving strategic actions and flexible ways to learn words that do not fit the typical patterns. (many high frequency/sight words, words that add inflectional endings in various ways or use prefixes or suffixes that can help with meaning, etc.) Two recent publications and a previous one that discuss phonics can be found at the following links.


https://www.fountasandpinnell.com/shared/resources/PhonicsResearchBase_FINAL.pdf

https://www.fountasandpinnell.com/shared/resources/FPC_PhonicsResearchAlignedToPWS.pdf
http://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/on-the-heinemann-podcast-a-word-on-phonics


Another article regarding the utility of phonics rules can be found at http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/uncg/f/F_Johnston_Utility_2001.pdf
Another source for a definition of terms can be found at https://www.commlearn.com/sight-words-decodable-words-high-frequency-words/

Best wishes!
Debbie
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